Love him!!! Childhood Favorite

Republic of Texas – Remember the Alamo! – The Lone Star State.

When I first joined the military I studied at Ft. Sam Houston. And I have been to the Alamo and have seen the 67 foot statue of him. 

Samuel “Sam” Houston (March 2, 1793 – July 26, 1863) was an American politician and soldier, best known for his role in bringing Texas into the United States as a constituent state. His victory at the Battle of San Jacinto secured the independence of Texas from Mexico in one of the shortest decisive battles in modern history. The only American to be elected governor of two states (as opposed to territories or indirect selection), Houston was also the only governor within a future Confederate state to oppose secession (which led to the outbreak of the American Civil War) and to refuse an oath of allegiance to the Confederacy, a decision that led to his removal from office by the Texas secession convention.

As governor, he refused to swear loyalty to the Confederacy when Texas seceded from the Union in 1861 with the outbreak of the American Civil War, and was removed from office. To avoid bloodshed, he refused an offer of a Union army to put down the Confederate rebellion. Instead, he retired to Huntsville, Texas, where he died before the end of the war.

Houston’s name has been honored in numerous ways. He is the namesake of the city of Houston, Texas’s most populous city and the fourth most populous city in the U.S.. Other things named for Sam Houston include: a memorial museum, five U.S. naval vessels named USS Houston (AK-1, CA-30, CL-81, SSBN-609, and SSN-713), a U.S. Army base, a national forest, a historical park, a university, an elementary school in Lebanon, TN (Sam Houston Elementary) and a prominent roadside statue outside of Huntsville.

Sam Houston and the Battle for Texas Independence 

“Remember the Alamo” is a well-known phrase. Do you know what it means?

Sam Houston had already served in the U.S. House of Representatives and as governor of Tennessee when he moved to Texas in 1832. At the time he arrived, Texas was part of Mexico and the site of rising tensions and violent disturbances between Mexican authorities and Anglo settlers from the United States. Voicing his support for a separate state of Texas, Houston emerged as a leader among the settlers. In 1835, he was chosen commander in chief of the Texas army.

The Alamo was an 18th century Franciscan Mission in San Antonio, Texas, which was the location of an important battle for Texans fighting for independence from Mexico. In 1836, a small group of Texans was defeated by Mexican General Santa Anna.

When Houston received word of the defeat at the Alamo, he was inspired to begin a month-long retreat to regroup and replenish the Texas army’s strength. Remembering how badly the Texans had been defeated at the Alamo, on April 21, 1836, Houston’s army won a quick battle against the Mexican forces at San Jacinto and gained independence for Texas. Soon after, Houston was elected president of the Republic of Texas. He continued to serve as senator and governor after Texas became part of the United States in 1845.

Sam Houston died in 1863 in Huntsville, Texas, where a 67-foot-tall memorial statue of him now stands. After a lifetime of service to his country, the event for which he is most well known is his role in the independence of Texas. 

National Mammography Day is observed annually on the third Friday in October as part of National Breast Cancer Awareness Month.


This day serves as a reminder to all women that the best defense is early detection. A mammogram can often detect a problem before there is any outward physical sign. Make sure you get your regular checkups.


Set up a mammogram and use #NationalMammographyDay to post on social media.


President Bill Clinton proclaimed the first National Mammography Day in 1993.

October 21, 2016

October 20, 2017

October 19, 2018

October 18, 2019

National Chocolate Cup Cake Day

National Chocolate Cupcake Day is observed annually on October 18. With a dollop of frosting, one sweet serving will satisfy chocolate and dessert lovers!
Cupcakes have also been known to be called:

Fairy Cakes,  Patty Cakes and Cup Cakes (different from Cupcakes (one-word)

Cupcakes can be traced back to 1796 when there was a recipe notation of “a cake to be baked in small cups” written in American Cookery, by Amelia Simmons. The earliest known documentation of the term cupcake was in 1828 in Seventy-five Receipts for Pastry, Cakes, and Sweetmeats in Eliza Leslie’s Receipts cookbook.

Cupcakes were originally baked in heavy pottery cups. Today, some bakers still use individual ramekins, small coffee mugs, large teacups, or other small ovenproof pottery-type dishes for baking their cupcakes.

National Disability Employment Awareness Month

National Disability Employment Awareness Month is an annual designation observed in October.

Use #DisabilityEmploymentAwarenessMonth to post on social media.


National Employ the Physically Handicapped Week was established in 1945 by Congress for the first week in October. In 1998 it was renamed National Disability Employment Awareness Month and extended to the entire month of October. In 2001 the Office of Disability Employment Policy took over promoting and maintaining National Disability Employment Awareness Month.

National Kick Butt Day!

National Kick Butt Day is observed annually on the second Monday in October. This is a day to give yourself a kick in the seat of the pants.
Work on achieving your goals. Have you been meaning to start an exercise program or a diet? Are you wanting to change jobs? Do you have projects around the house you need to accomplish? Today is the day to get started.


Use #NationalKickButtDay to post on social media.


Within our research, we were unable to find the origins of this day.

Christmas Columbus sailed the ocean blue in 1492 to find a place for me and you … or did he?

As the classroom rhyme goes, Christopher Columbus sailed the ocean blue in 1492 and discovered America. But there is more to the story of the explorer we celebrate with a federal holiday on the second Monday of every October. As historians have continued to learn and write more about the real life of Christopher Columbus, controversy has arisen over the validity of honoring the explorer as a hero.
Like many European explorers, Columbus encountered many indigenous people throughout his voyages. Singularly focused on his mission to find riches and conquer new lands, Columbus and his teams treated the indigenous groups they came across as obstacles to their greater mission. There are three main sources of controversy involving Columbus’s interactions with the indigenous people he labeled “Indians”: the use of violence and slavery, the forced conversion of native peoples to Christianity, and the introduction of a host of new diseases that would have dramatic long-term effects on native people in the Americas. Historians have uncovered extensive evidence of the damage wreaked by Columbus and his teams, leading to an outcry over emphasis placed upon studying and celebrating him in schools and public celebrations.

In an era in which the international slave trade was starting to grow, Columbus and his men enslaved many native inhabitants of the West Indies and subjected them to extreme violence and brutality. On his famous first voyage in 1492, Columbus landed on an unknown Caribbean island after an arduous three-month journey. On his first day in the New World, he ordered six of the natives to be seized, writing in his journal that he believed they would be good servants. Throughout his years in the New World, Columbus enacted policies of forced labor in which natives were put to work for the sake of profits. Later, Columbus sent thousands of peaceful Taino “Indians” from the island of Hispaniola to Spain to be sold. Many died en route. Those left behind were forced to search for gold in mines and on plantations. Within 60 years after Columbus landed, only a few hundred of what may have been 250,000 Taino were left on their island.


Agent Orange Awareness Month

AUGUST and OCTOBER are Agent Orange Awareness MonthSEPTEMBER 28, 20132

It’s time once again to observe Agent Orange Awareness Month. Here at Legacy of Our Veterans Military Exposures or lovme we began observing Agent Orange Awareness not only in the month of August but also October. I know it’s confusing to some but here is a little history behind Agent Orange Awareness Month.

My understanding is that most states have designated October as the month of choice but in Maine, where I live, it’s August.

Senator Susan Collins (R-ME) introduced and passed a resolution making August Agent Orange Awareness Month>>>S.Res.248 – A resolution designating the month of August 2009 as “Agent Orange Awareness Month”

FROM SENATOR COLLINS: Increase Agent Orange Awareness (reprinted here with permission)

“Increase Agent Orange Awareness” Weekly Column Senator Susan Collins August 21, 2009 More than 8.7 million American men and women bravely served our nation during the Vietnam War. More than 58,000 gave their lives defending freedom, including 339 from Maine.

Some three and a half decades later, an estimated 2.6 million Vietnam veterans bear an awful legacy from that conflict – severe, debilitating, and even fatal health problems that have resulted from their exposure to the herbicide Agent Orange. Adding to the tragedy is the fact that these health problems at times afflict not only just those who served in Vietnam, but also their children.


This is really close to were I live. 

Last fall we had bears in town in a tree. 

MONTMORENCY COUNTY, MI – A large, furry culprit is behind the recent ransacking of a man’s truck, UpNorthLive reported.

A black bear was able to open the door of Claude Conn’s unlocked truck and vandalize it. The bear also broke into his van, but left nothing aside from paw prints.

Conn told UpNorthLive the interior of his truck is completely destroyed. 

There are about 2,000 black bears in northern Michigan. But ransacking cars isn’t a normal activity for them.

“It’s kind of a rare instance, you know, something like that is definitely possible to happen, but it’s not something that people are notifying us about,” Shelby Hiestand, a wildlife biologist at the Michigan Department of Natural Resources, told UpNorthLive.

The best way to keep bears away is by not leaving food around.

“Problems with bears usually are connected with food source issues,” Hiestand said. “So people who might have bird feeders up, or they might have pet food outside, they might have grills where they were cooking food, so usually if a bear is coming near a human residence it’s because of a food-related issue.”
Meagan Beck | on October 04, 2016 

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