Weekly Photo Challenge – Offf Season #2

In response to The Daily Post’s weekly photo challenge: “Off-Season.”

Fall is the most beautifully time of the year in Upper Michigan.

Quote

My Pic of the Week

Flowers on Mackinaw Island

Flowers on Mackinaw Island

To see more of the flowers click here.

The Army’s Birthday: 14 June 1775

army

When the American Revolution broke out, the rebellious colonies did not possess an army in the modern sense. Rather, the revolutionaries fielded an amateur force of colonial troops, cobbled together from various New England militia companies.  They had no unified chain of command, and although Artemas Ward of Massachusetts exercised authority by informal agreement, officers from other colonies were not obligated to obey his orders.  The American volunteers were led, equipped, armed, paid for, and supported by the colonies from which they were raised.

In the spring of 1775, this “army” was about to confront British troops near Boston, Massachusetts. The revolutionaries had to re-organize their forces quickly if they were to stand a chance against Britain’s seasoned professionals. Recognizing the need to enlist the support of all of the American seaboard colonies, the Massachusetts Provincial Congress appealed to the Second Continental Congress in Philadelphia to assume authority for the New England army.  Reportedly, at John Adams’ request, Congress voted to “adopt” the Boston troops on June 14, although there is no written record of this decision.  Also on this day, Congress resolved to form a committee “to bring in a draft of rules and regulations for the government of the Army,” and voted $2,000,000 to support the forces around Boston, and those at New York City.  Moreover, Congress authorized the formation of ten companies of expert riflemen from Pennsylvania, Maryland, and Virginia, which were directed to march to Boston to support the New England militia.

George Washington received his appointment as commander-in-chief of the Continental Army the next day, and formally took command at Boston on July 3, 1775.

patriotic_soldier

I am an American Soldier.

I am a warrior and a member of a team.

I serve the people of the United States, and live the Army Values.

I will always place the mission first.

I will never accept defeat.

I will never quit.

I will never leave a fallen comrade.

I am disciplined, physically and mentally tough, trained and proficient in my warrior tasks and drills.

I always maintain my arms, my equipment and myself.

I am an expert and I am a professional.

I stand ready to deploy, engage, and destroy, the enemies of the United States of America in close combat.

I am a guardian of freedom and the American way of life.

I am an American Soldier.

For more information.

Weekly Photo Challenge – Off Season

In response to The Daily Post’s weekly photo challenge: “Off-Season.”

It is now summer in upper Michigan but…winter is only about 4 months away for us. We have gotten snow on Halloween.

my home

Quote

Flag Day in the United States – 14 June 2015

flagday2015

People across the United States celebrate Flag Day on June 14 each year to honor the United States flag and to commemorate the flag’s adoption. On the same day, the United States Army celebrates its birthday.

What do people do?

Flag Day falls within National Flag Week, a time when Americans reflect on the foundations of the nation’s freedom. The flag of the United States represents freedom and has been an enduring symbol of the country’s ideals since its early days. During both events, Americans also remember their loyalty to the nation, reaffirm their belief in liberty and justice, and observe the nation’s unity.

Public life

Although Flag Day is a nationwide observance, it is not a public holiday in many parts of the United States. It is a legal holiday in a few areas in the USA, such as Montour County in Pennsylvania.

More

June is National Summer Safety Month

National-Safety-Month_300x200

Summer Safety Tips for Kids

The final school bell has rung, the pencils and notebooks are packed away and the kids are ready for some summer fun! Children love the hot summer months, because they provide the perfect opportunity to spend lots of time outside. Whether it’s swimming in the pool, hiking through the woods, taking long walks, or going for a bike ride, there is something for everyone, no matter how young or old.

We hope that everyone enjoys this special time of year, but we want to also remind parents that there are potential dangers during the summer months, and it’s important to be aware of what they are. The more information one learns about how to prevent illnesses and injuries, the less likely they will occur.

There are many areas to cover when it comes to summer safety, and we’ll review just a few here. Please keep in mind that this is a brief list of tips.

Tick Bites

Ticks are responsible for a variety of illnesses including Lyme disease and Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever. These diseases can be very serious. Learn ways to protect your family. Some suggestions include:

  • protective clothing (long sleeves, long pants, tucking pants into socks)
  • tick/bug repellant
  • insect repellant for pets
  • staying in the center of paths, keeping away from overgrown areas and not sitting directly on the ground
  • performing tick checks on all family members every day
  • being aware of signs/symptoms of tick-related illnesses
  • calling the doctor for any concerns and questions

More

My Pic of the Week

bird on porch 2

This Robin was on my front porch.

June is Men’s Health Awareness Month

MensHealthTwitterChatGraphic

June is Men’s Health Awareness Month

June is a month designated to raise awareness about cancers affecting men and encourage early detection and treatment of disease among men and boys.

The cancers that most frequently affect men are:

Knowing about these cancers and how they can be prevented or found early can save your life.

Prostate Cancer

The chance of getting prostate cancer goes up as a man gets older. Most prostate cancers are found in men over the age of 65. For reasons that are still unknown, African American men are more likely than white men to develop prostate cancer. Having one or more close relatives with prostate cancer also increases a man’s risk of having prostate cancer.

What you can do: Screening and Prevention

The American Cancer Society recommends that men make an informed decision with their doctor about whether to be tested for prostate cancer. Starting at age 50 talk to your doctor about the pros and cons of testing so you can decide if getting tested is the right choice for you. If you are African American or have a father or brother who had prostate cancer before age 65, you should have this talk with your doctor starting at age 45. If you decide to be tested, you should have the PSA blood test (it measures the blood level of PSA, a protein that is produced by the prostate gland) with or without a rectal exam. How often you are tested will depend on your PSA level.

Lung Cancer

Smoking is the cause for more than 80% of all lung cancers, but people who do not smoke can also have lung cancer.

What you can do: Screening and Prevention

Lung cancer is one of the few cancers that can often be prevented simply by not smoking. If you are a smoker, ask your doctor or nurse to help you quit. If you don’t smoke, don’t start, and avoid breathing in other people’s smoke. If your friends and loved ones are smokers, help them quit.

Skin Cancer

Anyone who spends time in the sun can have skin cancer. People with fair skin, especially those with blond or red hair, are more likely to get skin cancer than people with darker coloring. People who have had a close family member with melanoma and those who had severe sunburns before the age of 18 are more likely to get skin cancer.

What you can do: Screening and Prevention

Most skin cancers can be prevented by avoiding the midday sun, between 1pm and 3 pm. Be aware of all moles and spots on your skin, and report any changes to your doctor right away. Have a skin exam during your regular health check-ups. When in the sun, wear hats with wide brims, long-sleeved shirts, sunglasses, and use a broad-spectrum sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or higher.

Colon Cancer

Any adult can have colorectal cancers (cancers of the colon and rectum), but most of these cancers are found in people age 50 or older. People with a personal or family history of this cancer, or who have polyps in their colon or rectum, or those with inflammatory bowel disease are more likely to have colon cancer. Also, eating a diet mostly of high fat foods (especially from animal sources), being overweight, smoking and being inactive can make a person more likely to have colon cancer.

What you can do: Screening and Prevention

Colon cancer almost always starts with a polyp. Testing can save lives by finding polyps before they become cancer. If pre-cancerous polyps are removed, colon cancer can be prevented. Eating a low-fat diet that is rich in fruits and vegetables may also make you less likely to have this cancer

World Oceans Day

HO2-small-poster

Since 2009, people around the world have celebrated World Oceans Day. The United Nations General Assembly took the concept, first proposed in 1992 and made it official on 5 December 2008. Since then, the event has grown and spread as the realization of the ocean’s importance to humanity has increased.

We have come to learn that oceans drive global systems that make it possible to live on this earth. So much of what we take for granted – oxygen, rainfall, much of our food – is dependent on the health of the ocean.

As understanding grows it is apparent that management of this global resource is of prime importance.

More

Weekly Photo Challenge – Vivid #2

In response to The Daily Post’s weekly photo challenge: “Vivid.”

flower after rain 3

Previous Older Entries Next Newer Entries

%d bloggers like this: