In come the March winds,
They blow and blow,
They sweep up the brown leaves
That green ones may grow.
–George Washington Wright Houghton, American poet (1850–91)

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My grandma always said March comes like a Lion and out like a Lamb

March brings with it the promise of gardening and warm(er), sunny days, as Earth turns its frostbitten cheek to winter and springs forth from the vernal equinox. Read about this month’s holidays, happenings, seasonal recipes, gardening tips, Moon phases, folklore, and much more!

In come the March winds,
They blow and blow,
They sweep up the brown leaves
That green ones may grow.

–George Washington Wright Houghton, American poet (1850–91)

March Calendar

The month of March was named for the Roman god of war, Mars. Traditionally, this was the time of year to resume military campaigns that had been interrupted by winter.

  • International Women’s Day is celebrated on March 8!
  • March has two full Moons this year! The first full Moon, the Full Worm Moon, occurs on the 1st at 7:51 P.M. EST. The second, the Full Sap Moon (also a Blue Moon), occurs on the 31st at 8:37 A.M. EDT. Click here to learn more about March’s Full Moons.
  • Daylight Saving Time begins on Sunday, March 11, at 2:00 A.M. Don’t forget to set your clocks forward! See more details about Daylight Saving Time.
  • St. Patrick’s Day is March 17. It falls on a Saturday this year. Read more about St. Patrick’s Day.
  • The Ides of March falls on March 15, and has long been considered an ill-fated day. Beware the Ides of March!
  • The vernal equinox, also called the Spring Equinox, marking the beginning of spring in the Northern Hemisphere, occurs on Tuesday, March 20 at 12:15 P.M. EDT. On this day, the Sun rises due east and sets due west. In the Southern Hemisphere, this date marks the autumnal equinox. Read more about the First Day of Spring!
  • According to lore, the last three days of March have a reputation for being stormy. Read about the Borrowing Days.
  • Easter Sunday arrives on April 1, 2018, culminating the Holy Week for Christian churches and commemorating the resurrection of Jesus Christ. Read more about Easter Sunday and why the date changes every year.

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