My grandma always said March comes like a Lion and out like a Lamb

March brings with it the promise of gardening and warm(er), sunny days, as Earth turns its frostbitten cheek to winter and springs forth from the vernal equinox. Read about this month’s holidays, happenings, seasonal recipes, gardening tips, Moon phases, folklore, and much more!

In come the March winds,
They blow and blow,
They sweep up the brown leaves
That green ones may grow.

–George Washington Wright Houghton, American poet (1850–91)

March Calendar

The month of March was named for the Roman god of war, Mars. Traditionally, this was the time of year to resume military campaigns that had been interrupted by winter.

  • International Women’s Day is celebrated on March 8!
  • March has two full Moons this year! The first full Moon, the Full Worm Moon, occurs on the 1st at 7:51 P.M. EST. The second, the Full Sap Moon (also a Blue Moon), occurs on the 31st at 8:37 A.M. EDT. Click here to learn more about March’s Full Moons.
  • Daylight Saving Time begins on Sunday, March 11, at 2:00 A.M. Don’t forget to set your clocks forward! See more details about Daylight Saving Time.
  • St. Patrick’s Day is March 17. It falls on a Saturday this year. Read more about St. Patrick’s Day.
  • The Ides of March falls on March 15, and has long been considered an ill-fated day. Beware the Ides of March!
  • The vernal equinox, also called the Spring Equinox, marking the beginning of spring in the Northern Hemisphere, occurs on Tuesday, March 20 at 12:15 P.M. EDT. On this day, the Sun rises due east and sets due west. In the Southern Hemisphere, this date marks the autumnal equinox. Read more about the First Day of Spring!
  • According to lore, the last three days of March have a reputation for being stormy. Read about the Borrowing Days.
  • Easter Sunday arrives on April 1, 2018, culminating the Holy Week for Christian churches and commemorating the resurrection of Jesus Christ. Read more about Easter Sunday and why the date changes every year.

February Fun Facts

The 2nd month of the year brings us George Washington’s Birthday, Valentine’s Day, and the shortest month of the year.

In the Gregorian calendar, the calendar that most of the world uses, February is the second month of the year. Most of the months have 30 or 31 days in a month but February is shorter. February has 28 days until Julius Caesar gave it 29 and 30 days every four years. This is because the Roman emperor Augustus took one day from February and added that to August because August was a month that was named after him. February is a very cold month followed by January in the northern half of the world. However, there are sunny days in February that indicates that spring is almost here. Different from the northern half, the southern hemisphere usually enjoys midsummer weather.

Below are some fun facts about February:

  1. The birthstone for February is Amethyst.
  2. Two zodiac signs for February are Aquarius (January 20 – February 18) and Pisces (February 19 – March 20)
  3. The month has 29 days in leap years, when the year number is divisible by four. In common years the month has 28 days.
  4. Viola (plant) and the Primrose are the birth flowers.
  5. Black History Month is celebrated in Canada and United States.
  6. National Day of the Sun is celebrated in Argentina.
  7. In order to complete the Soviet Union’s victory in Stalingrad during World War II, the last German troops surrendered in the Stalingrad pocket.
  8. On February 4, 1861, a temporary committee met at Montgomery, Alabama where they organized a Confederate States of America.
  9. On February 6, 1933, Amendment 20 to the United States was proclaimed which moved the Inauguration Day to January 20th.
  10. In February 1910, the Boy Scouts of America was incorporated.
  11. On February 6, 1899. The U.S. Senate ratified the peace treaty that led to the end of the Spanish-American War.
  12. On February 6, 1952, Princess Elizabeth became Queen Elizabeth II of Great Britain.
  13. February 11 – National Foundation Day in Japan
  14. February 12 – Abraham Lincoln’s Birthday
  15. February 14 – Valentine’s Day
  16. February 21 – International Mother Language Day
  17. February 22 – Independence Day in Saint Lucia
  18. February 22 – George Washington’s Birthday
  19. February 24 – Flag Day of Mexico
  20. February 25 – People Power Revolution (Philippines)

This month is very important to me. My mom passed away after having a major heart attack and we never knew she had heart problems. Get your heart checked and watch for the signs of a heart attack!



Happy Thanksgiving from my Family to Yours.



To You and Yours



How to Carve Your Turkey.




You’ve bought it, stuffed it, cooked it, and now you have to carve it. If you’re daunted by the task―some of the best cooks are―just remember that carving a turkey comes down to simple technique. Follow the easy steps in this video.

What You Need

  • carving board
  • chef’s knife (or slicing knife)
  • paper towels
  • platter
  • cutting board
  • long
  • flexible knife (or boning knife)
  • tongs

Follow These Steps

  1. Remove the string
    Place the turkey on a carving board. Remove the string tying the legs together, using the tip of your chef’s knife.
  2. Remove the legs and thighs
    Cut through the skin that connects the breast and the drumstick. Slice down until you reach the joint. Using a paper towel, grab the leg and push down, separating the leg and thigh from the bird. Use your chef’s knife to slice through the joint.
  3. Remove the drumsticks
    Separate the drumstick and the thigh by cutting through the joint that connects them. Transfer the drumstick to a platter; set aside the thigh meat on a cutting board to slice later. Repeat steps 2 and 3 with the other leg.
  4. Remove the wishbone
    Find the wishbone at the front end of the breast. Use your fingers to pull it out.
    Tip: Removing the wishbone makes it easier to carve off the breast meat.
  5. Remove turkey breasts
    Find the breastbone. Position a long, flexible knife (or a boning knife) on one side of it, and slice downward, as close to the bone as possible. As you slice, use your other hand to pull the meat away from the breastbone, until you’ve cut the breast off the carcass in one piece. Transfer to the cutting board.
  6. Remove the wings
    Using the chef’s knife, slicing through the joint to remove a wing, and transfer to the platter. Repeat steps 5 and 6 on the other side.
  7. Slice the thigh meat
    Work on the cutting board. Holding the thigh bone with tongs or a paper towel, remove the meat from the bone with the edge of the chef’s knife. Transfer meat to platter.
  8. Slice the breast meat
    Using the tongs to steady the breast, position the meat so you’ll cut it at its shorter length. Slice against the grain, taking care to keep the skin attached. Transfer pieces neatly to a platter.

Veterans Day

Veterans Day is an official United States federal holiday that is observed annually on November 11, honoring people who have served in the U.S. Armed Forces, also known as veterans. It coincides with other holidays including Armistice Day and Remembrance Day, which are celebrated in other parts of the world and also mark the anniversary of the end of World War I (major hostilities of World War I were formally ended at the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month of 1918, when the Armistice with Germany went into effect). The United States also originally observed Armistice Day; it then evolved into the current Veterans Day holiday in 1954.

Veterans Day is not to be confused with Memorial Day; Veterans Day celebrates the service of all U.S. military veterans, while Memorial Day is a day of remembering the men and women who gave their lives and those who perished while in service.[1]


Previous Older Entries

Mon beau manoir

Une galerie d'art de vivre, un blog lifestyle !

Life Plan

Make Some History


Psychology to Motivate | Inspire | Uplift


Saving money toward financial freedom

Joshi Daniel Photography

Images of People Photoblog

LIFE AS I SEE IT - with one eye closed.

NEW BEGINNINGS.....A new view, a new challenge, a new adventure.

Olivia Lane Photos

Maryland natural light photographer. Lifestyle. Beauty. Portraiture. Boudoir. (For women. By a woman)

A Teller of Stories

Tales of life through words and images

%d bloggers like this: