October Fun Facts

The 10th month of the year brings us Halloween, Columbus Day, and the Jewish holiday of Yom Kippur.

In the Georgian calendar, the calendar that most of the world uses, October is the tenth month of the year. In early Roman calendar, it was actually the eighth month and there are 31 days in October ever since the since of the Roman emperor August. In North Temperature zone, the first frost happens, leaves change colors and leaves fall. By the time, most of the birds would have left for the South hemisphere to protect themselves from cold weather. However, in southern hemisphere, October’s weather is just like the northern hemisphere’s April weather. In October, farmers bring the last of the fall crops and ship them to other parts of the U.S. and also, many apples are harvested.

Below are some fun facts about October:

1 The birthstones for October are the tourmaline and the opal.

2 The zodiac signs for October are Libra (September 23 – October 22) and Scorpio (October 23 – November 21).

3 The birth flower for October is the calendula.

4 On October 1, 1896, free rural delivery of mail started in the United States.

5 On October 4, 1957, the first artificial satellite was launched by the Soviet Union.

6 On October 5, 1947, the first presidential telecast address from the White House was made by Harry S. Truman.

7 On October 7, 1816, the Washington (first double-decked steamboat) arrived at New Orleans.

8 On October 12, 1492, Christopher Columbus landed in America.

9 On October 18, 1867, The U.S. flag was formally raised over Alaska.

10 On October 22, 1836, Sam Houston was inaugurated as the first president of the Republic of Texas.

11 On October 31, 1864, Nevada became the 36th state of the United States.

12 National Cookie Month

13 National Chili Month

14 National Pizza Month

15 National Dessert Month

16 Lupus Awareness Month

17 National Seafood Month

18 November 5 – World Teacher’s Day

19 Columbus Day – second Monday of October

20 October 31 – Halloween

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National VFW Day

National VFW Day is observed annually on September 29, honoring the men and women devoted to this valuable organization and those members who have served our nation. 

Members of the VFW today hold a long-standing history of volunteerism in their communities. Not only have they served their country, but they continue to serve their fellow veterans, families, and communities by sponsoring scholarships, career fairs, mental wellness campaigns, and so many more excellent services.

VFW membership since its inception has been instrumental in the establishment of the Veterans Administration, the creation of the national cemetery system and passage of the GI Bill. Through the VFW, veterans honor veterans and serve their communities.  On National VFW Day, take a moment to recognize all the VFW does in your community.

HOW TO OBSERVE

Honor the VFW members and veterans in your community. Let them know that you appreciate the sacrifices they have made for all of us. We truly are the land of the free because of the brave. Use #NationalVFWDay to post on social media.

HISTORY

The VFW was established on September 29, 1899, by a group of veterans from the Spanish-American War and the Philippine Insurrection. It has since grown to be the nation’s largest group of combat veterans. They continue “to honor the dead by helping the living.” The VFW promote patriotism, goodwill and youth scholarships. They also provide military assistance and community service programs, promote youth activities and volunteer many hours in their local communities.

Whether getting one to go or lingering over a second cup, on September 29 be sure to observe National Coffee Day!

NATIONAL COFFEE DAY

Ah, the perfect cup of java.  According to an expert cupper (a professional coffee taster), there are four components of a perfect cup: aroma, body, acidity, and flavor.

From the moment the average coffee lover opens a fresh bag of coffee beans, the aroma beckons, percolating the senses. Even those who don’t drink coffee tend to enjoy the fragrance a roasted bean casts.

When determining the body of a coffee, the bean, the roast, and the brew are all factors. The bean affects the texture of the coffee, whether it’s silky, creamy, thick or thin on the tongue and throat. However, the darker the roast and how it is brewed will alter the feel of a coffee’s body, too. Grandpa’s motor oil blend versus the coffee shop around the corner’s silky smooth, well-practiced grind have entirely different bodies.

The region a coffee is grown determines its acidity. The higher the elevation the coffee grows, the higher the quality and the acidity. These coffees are considered brighter, dryer, even sparkling by cuppers.

When it comes down to it, coffee lovers cherish the flavor as well as the caffeinated boost this roasted bean gives morning or night, black or with cream and sugar. Hot or cold it provides enjoyment even when decaffeinated!

There are many legendary accounts of how coffee first came to be, but the earliest credible evidence of either coffee drinking or the knowledge of the coffee tree appears in the middle of the 15th century in the Sufi monasteries around Mokha in Yemen.  It was here coffee seeds were first roasted and brewed, much like they are prepared today. Yemeni traders brought coffee back to their homeland from Ethiopia and began to cultivate the seed.

In 1670, coffee seeds were smuggled out of the Middle East by Baba Budan, as he strapped seven coffee seeds onto his chest.  The first plants grown from these smuggled seeds were planted in Mysore.  It was then that coffee spread to Italy, to the rest of Europe, to Indonesia and the Americas.

Brazil produces more coffee in the world than any other country followed by Colombia. More than 50 countries around the world grow coffee, providing a delicious variety for the indulgence of steamy cups of the black drink for connoisseurs to consume.

HOW TO OBSERVE.

Enjoy a cup or two of your favorite coffee. Use #NationalCoffeeDay to post on social media.  Here is a list of National Coffee Day Specials.

Uncle Sam Day

Uncle Sam Day - September 13

Uncle Sam Day – September 13

The man behind the iconic image and fascinating nickname for the United States government is recognized on Uncle Sam Day, born on September 13, 1766.

Sam Wilson, a meatpacker from New York, supplied barrels of meat to soldiers during the war of 1812.  To identify the meat for shipment, Wilson prominently stamped “U.S.” on the barrels.  It wasn’t long before the soldiers dubbed the grub a delivery from Uncle Sam.  As such nicknames tend to do, its popularity spread.

The first illustration of Uncle Sam is unlike the one we know today.  Published by Harper’s Weekly in 1861, the young government representative (a starred bandana on his head and wearing a striped vest)  is depicted dividing up Virginia like a butcher. The image of Uncle Sam would take many forms over the years.

Credit is given to German-born illustrator and cartoonist Thomas Nast for developing the long-legged Uncle Sam with the starred top hat and striped pants who is more like the one we know today.  The Harper’s Weekly political cartoonist took on many issues with his Uncle Sam character including Boss Tweed, Union recruitment, and Reconstruction.

During the modern era, Uncle Sam obtained some color.  The United States Army awarded Montgomery Flagg with the artwork for the familiar portrait used in the “I Want You For The U.S. Army” campaign during World War I.  It first appeared on the cover of Leslie’s Weekly, an illustrated literary and news magazine.

HOW TO OBSERVE

Use #UncleSamDay to post on social media.

HISTORY

President George W. Bush proclaimed Uncle Sam Day to be September 13, 1989, in honor of the anniversary of the birth of Samuel Wilson.  It coincided with the bicentennial celebration of the City of Troy, New York where Wilson lived and worked.  The City of Try requested the designation of the President.

On September 7, 1961, through concurrent resolutions Congress officially named Uncle Sam a permanent symbol of American strength and idealism.

Labor Day

Labor-Day-Pics-2

Always the first Monday in September, Labor Day was the idea of Peter J. Maguire (although recent research has shown that it might have been his brother Matthew’s idea), a labor union leader who in 1882 proposed a celebration honoring the American worker.

The date chosen was simply “convenient,” according to Maguire, because it was midway between the Fourth of July and Thanksgiving.

Although the day’s focus on organized labor has diminished over the years, the holiday has become a way to mark the end of the summer season—and the start of the school year.

Labor Day Dates: When Is Labor Day?

Year Labor Day
2017 Monday, September 4
2018 Monday, September 3
2019 Monday, September 2

September Fun Facts

The 9th month of the year brings us Labor Day, and the start of the Fall season.

In the Georgian calendar, the calendar that most of the world uses, September is the ninth month of the year. However, it used to be the seventh month on the Roman calendar. It had 29 and 31 days but it later was changed to 30 days by Emperor Augustus. In Southern United States, it is the warmest months of the year and very cool nights for Northern states. It is the harvest time for crops and that is why Switzerland calls September the harvest month. In the Northern hemisphere, beginning of September leads to the beginning of meteorological autumn while it is the beginning of the meteorological spring in southern hemisphere.

Below are some fun facts about September:

  1. The birthstone for September is the sapphire.
  2. The zodiac signs for September are Virgo (August 23 – September 22) and Libra (September 23 – October 22)
  3. The birth flower for September is the morning glory.
  4. On September 1, 1905, Alberta and Saskatchewan were established.
  5. On September 1, 1939, World War II began in Europe because the German troops invaded Poland.
  6. On September 2, 1789, the United States Department of Treasury was established.
  7. On September 3, 1783, the Revolutionary War in America ended after Great Britain signed the Treaty of Paris.
  8. On September 6, 1901, William McKinley, the 25th President of the United States, was assassinated.
  9. On September 8, 1565, the first permanent white settlement was founded in St.Augustine, Florida.
  10. On September 10, 1846, Elias Howe patented his sewing machine.
  11. On September 14, 1847, United States forces took control of Mexico City.
  12. On September 14, 1940, the Selective Service Act was passed by Congress which provided the first peacetime draft in the United States history.
  13. National Chicken Month
  14. National Rice Month
  15. National Potato Month
  16. National All-American Breakfast Month
  17. Labor Day – first Monday of September
  18. September 8 – Pardon Day
  19. September 13 – Uncle Sam Day (his image was first used in 1813)
  20. September 16 – Mexican Independence Day

Goodbye August!

septdoor

Image

Happy Birthday to our favorite brown-eyed beagle, Snoopy! 🎂🎉 This strip was published on August 10, 1968

Romance Awareness Month

Romance Awareness Month is an annual designation observed in August.

CELEBRATE
Being aware of and adding more romance into your relationship will be a win-win for both you and your significant other.  Romance has always been a very important part of relationships. Sometimes it is the little things that really make a big difference,  such as; holding a hand, rubbing a shoulder, a flower, dinner, a song, a note, watching a movie together, etc..  

Romance Awareness Month is also a great time to catch up on some reading with the wide selection of romance novels that are available. 

If posting on social media use #RomanceAwarenessMonth.

HISTORY
The origin of Romance Awareness Month has not been determined. 

National Crayon Collection Month

Preparing for the return to school, National Crayon Collection Month in August makes a point of ensuring every child has this essential school supply.

Those gently used, but discarded restaurant crayons are the focus of Crayon Collection, a 501c3 non-profit organization dedicated to redirecting mountains of much-needed crayons from landfills to schools. National Crayon Collection Month draws awareness to the environmental and social impact of throwing crayons away while students across the country go without crucial classroom supplies.

Throughout the month, families and teachers are encouraged to ask managers of kid-friendly restaurants to save their discarded crayons.  At the end of the campaign, they can return to the restaurant, collect the restaurant’s saved crayons and donate them to their local schools. Bringing all those simple but brightly colored art tools to classrooms will free up teacher resources and place them into the hands of children who might have gone without.

Our goal is for every child in America to have the crayons they need in time for the start of school. With the help of kid-friendly restaurants we can reallocate resources so that instead of trashing this like-new art supply, we can collect them for children to learn and expand their imaginations with. ~Sheila Michail Morovati – Founder Crayon Collection

Crayons don’t decompose, but in the hands of young, supple minds, they foster visual learning, creativity, and academic achievement. Annually, over 150 million restaurant crayons given to young diners eventually end up in landfills. End to end, those crayons could span the contiguous United States 3 times or scale the Empire State Building 30,175 times. Wouldn’t those barely used crayons better serve the nearly 16 million children who live in poverty and are unable to afford even this simple tool of expression?  By collecting and redistributing crayons, our teachers can put some of the almost $900 of their own money they spend preparing their classrooms each fall, back into their pockets. Districts across the country continue to cut art funding despite the research supporting the positive impacts it has on scholastic performance. Putting art back in the classroom and giving students an environment for creativity cultivates curiosity and promotes learning.

HOW TO OBSERVE

Ask the question of your local restaurants. “Will you save crayons?” Be sure to make a commitment, too.  Collect the crayons from the restaurant at the end of the month and donate them to your schools. Teachers can participate in the Crayon Collection Curriculum to bring more art into your classroom. Share photos of your collections and art by using #GotCrayons on social media to encourage others to participate and to show how simply you can gain access to thousands of crayons. Want to learn more? Visit Crayon Collection and find out more about how to participate in National Crayon Collection Month.
Follow Crayon Collection on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter, too!

Kid Friendly Restaurants
IHOP                                          Denny’s
Applebees                                  BJ’s
Cracker Barrel                           Olive Garden
California Pizza Kitchen          Outback
Island’s Restaurants                Buffalo Wild Wings
Bubba Gump

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