MACBETH ~ Act IV, Scene I

This is one of my favorites….

https://youtu.be/VY0Hyza6C-U

MACBETH ~ Act IV, Scene I

First Witch

Round about the cauldron go;
In the poison’d entrails throw.
Toad, that under cold stone
Days and nights has thirty-one
Swelter’d venom sleeping got,
Boil thou first i’ the charmed pot.

ALL

Double, double toil and trouble;
Fire burn, and cauldron bubble.

Second Witch

Fillet of a fenny snake,
In the cauldron boil and bake;
Eye of newt and toe of frog,
Wool of bat and tongue of dog,
Adder’s fork and blind-worm’s sting,
Lizard’s leg and owlet’s wing,
For a charm of powerful trouble,
Like a hell-broth boil and bubble.

ALL

Double, double toil and trouble;
Fire burn and cauldron bubble.

Third Witch

Scale of dragon, tooth of wolf,
Witches’ mummy, maw and gulf
Of the ravin’d salt-sea shark,
Root of hemlock digg’d i’ the dark,
Finger of birth-strangled babe
Ditch-deliver’d by a drab,
Make the gruel thick and slab:
Add thereto a tiger’s chaudron,
For the ingredients of our cauldron.

ALL

Double, double toil and trouble;
Fire burn and cauldron bubble. 

Second Witch

Cool it with a baboon’s blood,
Then the charm is firm and good.

By the pricking of my thumbs,
Something wicked this way comes.

Just couldn’t help sharing……

Happy holiday! Here are some general safety tips to be safe on the 4th!

***Fireworks

-Do not use alcohol when handling or lighting fireworks

-Follow the instructions on the label

-Only ignite outdoors away from structures

-Light them one at a time

-Never reignite “duds”

-Keep away from children

-Store in a cool, dry place

-Never point, throw or shoot fireworks at people or animals

-Keep pets inside

-Don’t ignite from metal or glass containers

-Don’t carry in pockets

-Use caution even with sparklers, which burn at more than 1,000 degrees

-Keep water, a hose, or portable fire extinguisher nearby in case of small fires

-Douse used fireworks with water when done and dispose properly according to the label.

***Water Activity Safety

-Review safe boating practices

-Never consume alcohol while driving a boat

-Assure there are enough life preservers for every passenger

-Set water safety rules for your family

-Pools should be enclosed or otherwise have restricted access to unattended children

***Grilling

-Never grill indoors, in a garage, or any other enclosed area that may catch on fire

-Keep the grill at least 10 feet away from any flammable materials

-Keep children away from grills

-Check gas grill hoses for cracks, holes, and leaks which can cause fire or explosions.

-Keep a portable fire extinguisher nearby

NATIONAL MONTH OF HOPE

During April, buds come into full bloom brightening our days, and National Month of Hope also lends a hand in lifting our spirits.

Bringing hope to someone can take many forms. Being a positive role model in the life of a child or providing a community a foundation for future endeavors both provide hope for the future. Lift the spirits of a friend suffering from a medical issue or volunteer at a local homeless shelter. We are each able to bring a ray of hope in our own ways by contributing wisdom, time, kindness and when possible donate to charities that make the impossible possible.

HOW TO OBSERVE

Everyone needs a little hope now and then.  Spread a little sunshine their way and bring some hope into their lives.

❖ Volunteer by reading to children in schools
❖ Experience meaningful and healthy communication with loved ones, family, friends, co-workers,
and colleagues
❖ Giving of time, food, and money to help families in need
❖ Minister to those incarcerated by writing letters and visiting
❖ Post on social media words of hope
❖ Sharing your story of overcoming with those who are going through hard times
❖ Lending a helping hand to those in need
❖ Cleaning up areas where there is trash such as parks and beaches
❖ Spend a day with the homeless whether on the streets in shelters, etc. “Unless you walk a mile in their shoes you won’t know how to help!”

Use #NationalHopeMonth to share your hope on social media.

HISTORY

H.O.P.E.

Mothers In Crisis, Inc. founded National Month of Hope to help spread hope around the world.  Founded by Rosalind Tompkins in 1991 when she was just four years clean and sober, Mothers In Crisis, Inc. supports women and families who are in need bringing them hope and empowering them to find a new path.

On Mothers In Crisis 25th Anniversary in April of 2016, they received proclamations from the City of Tallahassee and the Board of County Commissioners acknowledging the significant contributions Mothers In Crisis has made in their region and also declaring Friday as Hope Universe Day.

The Registrar at National Day Calendar proclaimed National Month of Hope to be observed annually beginning in 2018.

There are over 1,500 national days. Don’t miss a single one. Celebrate Every Day with National Day Calendar!

To You and Yours

food-thanksgiving

Image

Enjoy your Turkey

 

MICKEY MOUSE BIRTHDAY

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“I only hope that we never lose sight of one thing – that it was all started by a mouse.”

—Walt Disney, Disneyland; October 27, 1954

Mickey Mouse is a funny animal cartoon character and the official mascot of The Walt Disney Company. He was created by Walt Disney and Ub Iwerks at the Walt Disney Studios in 1928. An anthropomorphic mouse who typically wears red shorts, large yellow shoes, and white gloves, Mickey has become one of the most recognizable cartoon characters in the world.

Mickey first was seen in a single test screening (Plane Crazy). Mickey officially debuted in the short film Steamboat Willie (1928), one of the first sound cartoons. He went on to appear in over 130 films, including The Band Concert (1935), Brave Little Tailor (1938), and Fantasia (1940). Mickey appeared primarily in short films, but also occasionally in feature-length films. Ten of Mickey’s cartoons were nominated for the Academy Award for Best Animated Short Film, one of which, Lend a Paw, won the award in 1942. In 1978, Mickey became the first cartoon character to have a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

Beginning in 1930, Mickey has also been featured extensively as a comic strip character. His self-titled newspaper strip, drawn primarily by Floyd Gottfredson, ran for 45 years. Mickey has also appeared in comic books and in television series such as The Mickey Mouse Club (1955–1996) and others. He also appears in other media such as video games as well as merchandising, and is a meetable character at the Disney parks.

Mickey generally appears alongside his girlfriend Minnie Mouse, his pet dog Pluto, his friends Donald Duck, and Goofy, and his nemesis Pete, among others. Originally characterized as a mischievous antihero, Mickey’s increasing popularity led to his being rebranded as an everyman, usually seen as a flawed, but adventurous hero. In 2009, Disney began to re-brand the character again by putting less emphasis on his pleasant, cheerful side and reintroducing the more mischievous and adventurous sides of his personality, beginning with the video game Epic Mickey.
Origin

Concept art of Mickey from early 1928; the sketches are the earliest known drawings of the character, from the collection of The Walt Disney Family Museum.
“I only hope that we never lose sight of one thing – that it was all started by a mouse.”

—Walt Disney, Disneyland; October 27, 1954
Mickey Mouse was created as a replacement for Oswald the Lucky Rabbit, an earlier cartoon character created by the Disney studio for Charles Mintz, a film producer who distributed product through Universal Studios.[4] In the spring of 1928, with the series going strong, Disney asked Mintz for an increase in the budget. But Mintz instead demanded that Walt take a 20 percent budget cut, and as leverage, he reminded Disney that Universal owned the character, and revealed that he had already signed most of Disney’s current employees to his new contract. Angrily, Disney refused the deal and returned to produce the final Oswald cartoons he contractually owed Mintz. Disney was dismayed at the betrayal by his staff, but determined to restart from scratch. The new Disney Studio initially consisted of animator Ub Iwerks and a loyal apprentice artist, Les Clark, who together with Wilfred Jackson were among the few who remained loyal to Walt. One lesson Disney learned from the experience was to thereafter always make sure that he owned all rights to the characters produced by his company.

Origin

In the spring of 1928, Disney asked Ub Iwerks to start drawing up new character ideas. Iwerks tried sketches of various animals, such as dogs and cats, but none of these appealed to Disney. A female cow and male horse were also rejected. They would later turn up as Clarabelle Cow and Horace Horsecollar. (A male frog, also rejected, would later show up in Iwerks’ own Flip the Frog series.)  Walt Disney got the inspiration for Mickey Mouse from a tame mouse at his desk at Laugh-O-Gram Studio in Kansas City, Missouri.  In 1925, Hugh Harman drew some sketches of mice around a photograph of Walt Disney. These inspired Ub Iwerks to create a new mouse character for Disney.  “Mortimer Mouse” had been Disney’s original name for the character before his wife, Lillian, convinced him to change it, and ultimately Mickey Mouse came to be.  The actor Mickey Rooney claimed that, during his Mickey McGuire days, he met cartoonist Walt Disney at the Warner Brothers studio, and that Disney was inspired to name Mickey Mouse after him.  This claim however has been debunked by Disney historian Jim Korkis, since at the time of Mickey Mouse’s development, Disney Studios had been located on Hyperion Avenue for several years, and Walt Disney never kept an office or other working space at Warner Brothers, having no professional relationship with Warner Brothers, as the Alice Comedies and Oswald cartoons were distributed by Universal.

The article provided by Wikipedia – find more information about Mickey Mouse by going to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mickey_Mouse

Veterans Day

Veterans Day is an official United States federal holiday that is observed annually on November 11, honoring people who have served in the U.S. Armed Forces, also known as veterans. It coincides with other holidays including Armistice Day and Remembrance Day, which are celebrated in other parts of the world and also mark the anniversary of the end of World War I (major hostilities of World War I were formally ended at the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month of 1918, when the Armistice with Germany went into effect). The United States also originally observed Armistice Day; it then evolved into the current Veterans Day holiday in 1954.

Veterans Day is not to be confused with Memorial Day; Veterans Day celebrates the service of all U.S. military veterans, while Memorial Day is a day of remembering the men and women who gave their lives and those who perished while in service.[1]

Happy-Veterans-Day

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