How to save money on Halloween.

I found this great article about Halloween and saving money!

POSTED BY: KATE HORRELL SEPTEMBER 17, 2017

I know it is only mid-September, but Halloween will be here before you know it.

Depending on your family situation, how you feel about the holiday, and where you live, Halloween can be awfully expensive.  I’m not a big fan of Halloween, but I do have four kids, and we live in a kid-filled neighborhood.  I’ve got to plan ahead if I’m not going to drop $50 on candy on the 30th of October.

Costumes

Costumes for Halloween can run the gamut from an old sheet with eyes cut out, to elaborate outfits with specialty items from head to toe.  Planning ahead is key to spending less.  First, make everyone, kids and grown-ups, decide on their costume early.  In my house, we have a rule:  if you want parental assistance with your costume, you must submit your needs by 1 October.  This gives you time to implement the three best ways to save:  borrow, thrift, and DIY.

First, ask around to see if friends have the costume item you need.   Put out a Facebook request or activate your phone tree.  Free is awesome, and people are typically thrilled to have their things put to good use.

Second, check with thrift stores and consignment shops.  Shop early – all the best stuff will fly out of the stores.  You can find everything from entire costumes to bits and pieces to give your costume that extra bit of goodness.  Think outside of the box about how you can repurpose items to fit your plan.

Lastly, see what you can make yourself.  Pinterest is a great place to find directions and ideas.  I’ve made a ton of my kids costumes – everything from a flower to Hermione Granger to medieval princesses – but I’m a pretty proficient seamstress.  But you don’t need to sew to put together a great costume.  Many ideas require no more than a hot glue gun or a bunch of safety pins.

Decorations

I’m a Halloween Scrooge, but I understand that some folks enjoy decorating for Halloween.  (Is that an understatement?)

Once again, the thrift store and DIY are your friend.  If you have children, enlist them to decorate pumpkins cut out of construction paper; anything made by your babies is automatically better than anything from the store.  Spray paint can turn even dollar store items into swanky decor.

Candy

Your strategy for saving money on candy is going to depend on a few things about you.  If you, or someone in your house, as a sweet tooth, then you probably don’t want to buy ahead.  Buying twice does not save money!

Check your newspapers for coupons, then keep an eye on sales.  In my experience, the commissary has the lowest prices consistently, but you can find deals if you match a sale with a coupon at places like Walgreens or Target.

Another idea is to give out non-food treats.  A bunch of bouncy balls, temporary tattoos or mini-bubbles can be cheap if you plan online and order ahead.

Whether you’re all into Halloween, or just don’t want to be labelled the neighborhood witch, there are ways to decrease your expenses on Halloween without turning off the lights and hiding in your house.  Starting early is the best way to keep those costs down, so start thinking about your Halloween strategy now.

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Romance Awareness Month

Romance Awareness Month is an annual designation observed in August.

CELEBRATE
Being aware of and adding more romance into your relationship will be a win-win for both you and your significant other.  Romance has always been a very important part of relationships. Sometimes it is the little things that really make a big difference,  such as; holding a hand, rubbing a shoulder, a flower, dinner, a song, a note, watching a movie together, etc..  

Romance Awareness Month is also a great time to catch up on some reading with the wide selection of romance novels that are available. 

If posting on social media use #RomanceAwarenessMonth.

HISTORY
The origin of Romance Awareness Month has not been determined. 

The Story of the Fourth of July


The Declaration of Independence

We celebrate American Independence Day on the Fourth of July every year. We think of July 4, 1776, as a day that represents the Declaration of Independence and the birth of the United States of America as an independent nation.

But July 4, 1776 wasn’t the day that the Continental Congress decided to declare independence (they did that on July 2, 1776).

It wasn’t the day we started the American Revolution either (that had happened back in April 1775).

And it wasn’t the day Thomas Jefferson wrote the first draft of the Declaration of Independence (that was in June 1776). Or the date on which the Declaration was delivered to Great Britain (that didn’t happen until November 1776). Or the date it was signed (that was August 2, 1776).

 

So what did happen on July 4, 1776?

The Continental Congress approved the final wording of the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776. They’d been working on it for a couple of days after the draft was submitted on July 2nd and finally agreed on all of the edits and changes.

July 4, 1776, became the date that was included on the Declaration of Independence, and the fancy handwritten copy that was signed in August (the copy now displayed at the National Archives in Washington, D.C.) It’s also the date that was printed on the Dunlap Broadsides, the original printed copies of the Declaration that were circulated throughout the new nation. So when people thought of the Declaration of Independence, July 4, 1776 was the date they remembered.

In contrast, we celebrate Constitution Day on September 17th of each year, the anniversary of the date the Constitution was signed, not the anniversary of the date it was approved. If we’d followed this same approach for the Declaration of Independence we’d being celebrating Independence Day on August 2nd of each year, the day the Declaration of Independence was signed!

 

How did the Fourth of July become a national holiday?

For the first 15 or 20 years after the Declaration was written, people didn’t celebrate it much on any date. It was too new and too much else was happening in the young nation. By the 1790s, a time of bitter partisan conflicts, the Declaration had become controversial. One party, the Democratic-Republicans, admired Jefferson and the Declaration. But the other party, the Federalists, thought the Declaration was too French and too anti-British, which went against their current policies.

By 1817, John Adams complained in a letter that America seemed uninterested in its past. But that would soon change.

After the War of 1812, the Federalist party began to come apart and the new parties of the 1820s and 1830s all considered themselves inheritors of Jefferson and the Democratic-Republicans. Printed copies of the Declaration began to circulate again, all with the date July 4, 1776, listed at the top. The deaths of Thomas Jefferson and John Adams on July 4, 1826, may even have helped to promote the idea of July 4 as an important date to be celebrated.

Celebrations of the Fourth of July became more common as the years went on and in 1870, almost a hundred years after the Declaration was written, Congress first declared July 4 to be a national holiday as part of a bill to officially recognize several holidays, including Christmas. Further legislation about national holidays, including July 4, was passed in 1939 and 1941.

Day Three: “Water” — Image Orientation

Day Three: “Water” — Image Orientation

In the Caribbean. The water is beautiful.

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We all have stories about water: how it has saved or defeated us. How it reminds us of family vacations, outdoor adventures, or the hot summers of our childhood. How it symbolizes a place we’ve left behind, or one we dream of visiting.

How will you interpret today’s theme?

Today’s Tip: Ever wonder whether a photograph will work better horizontally or vertically? After you snap your picture, rotate your camera and take a shot from the other orientation — horizontally if you first took the picture vertically, and vice versa. Which way works better?

Visit the resource page for more on image orientation. Remember to tag your post with #developingyoureye and check the Reader to see posts from fellow course participants!

Emancipation Proclamation

 

19th of June is known as Juneteenth, an African-American holiday begun at the end of slavery days. Its origins are Texan, not Louisianan, but Juneteenth has long had strong roots in the South and has since spread all over the country as a time for African-Americans to commemorate their freedom and accomplishments.

US Army – June 14 1777

I am an American Soldier.

I am a warrior and a member of a team.

I serve the people of the United States, and live the Army Values.

I will always place the mission first.

I will never accept defeat.

I will never quit.

I will never leave a fallen comrade.

I am disciplined, physically and mentally tough, trained and proficient in my warrior tasks and drills.

I always maintain my arms, my equipment and myself.

I am an expert and I am a professional.

I stand ready to deploy, engage, and destroy, the enemies of the United States of America in close combat.

I am a guardian of freedom and the American way of life.

I am an American Soldier.

All gave some but some gave all!

I colored this last year and had to post.

March Fun Facts

The 3rd month of the year brings us Palm Sunday, St. Patrick’s Day, and the start of Spring.

In the Georgian calendar, the calendar that most of the world uses, March is the third month of the year. However, it was the first month and named Martius in the early Roman calendar. Later, the ancient Romans made January to be the first month so March became the third month, which always had 31 days. The name Mars was named after the Roman god of war. In March, the winter ends and spring begins. In the northern half of the world, spring begins in March 19-21, which is the day when the sun is directly over the equator. At this time, the animals end hibernation and begin to show up.

Below are some fun facts about March:

  1. The birthstone for March is the aquamarine.
  2. The zodiac signs for March are Aries (March 21 – April 19) and Pisces (February 19 – March 20)
  3. The birth flower for March is daffodil.
  4. American Red Cross Month
  5. Fire Prevention Month
  6. Women’s History Month
  7. National Reading Day
  8. Saint David’s Day
  9. World Math’s Day – the first Wednesday in March
  10. March 1 is the date the Nebraskans celebrate the admission of their state to the union.
  11. March 2nd is celebrated by Texas as the anniversary of its independence from Mexico.
  12. On March 4, 1681, William Penn was granted Pennsylvania’s royal charter.
  13. March 25th is celebrated by people in Maryland to commemorate the arrival of the first Maryland colonists in 1634.
  14. Purim, a Jewish festival usually occurs in March. It is held on the day corresponding to the 14th day of Adar on the Hebrew calendar.
  15. March 8 – International Women’s Day
  16. March 14 – Pi Day
  17. March 19 – Saint Joseph’s Day
  18. March 22 – World Water Day
  19. March 23 – Pakistan Day
  20. March 26 – Bangladeshi Independence Day

All you need is love. But a little chocolate now and then doesn’t hurt”. (Charles Schulz)

 

happy-valentines-day-clip-art-5Each year on February 14th, many people exchange cards, candy, gifts or flowers with their special “valentine.” The day of romance we call Valentine’s Day is named for a Christian martyr and dates back to the 5th century, but has origins in the Roman holiday Lupercalia.

Lovers’ holiday celebrated on February 14, the feast day of St. Valentine, one of two 3rd-century Roman martyrs of the same name. St. Valentine is considered the patron of lovers and especially of those unhappily in love. The feast day became a lovers’ festival in the 14th century, probably as an extension of pagan love festivals and fertility rites celebrated in mid-February.

Until the 19th century handwritten valentines were often given rather than modern mass-produced greeting cards.

“I don’t understand why Cupid was chosen to represent Valentine’s Day. When I think about romance, the last thing on my mind is a short, chubby toddler coming at me with a weapon.”
Unknown

Just a little heart attack!

Just-a-Little-Heart-Attack-700x395

Inspired by the true stories of real women impacted by heart disease, the American Heart Association’s Go Red For Women movement and Emmy-nominated actress Elizabeth Banks created the short film, “Just a Little Heart Attack,” to educate women about the realities of heart disease and encourage them to put their health first. The short film, directed by and starring Ms. Banks, chronicles one woman’s experience ignoring her symptoms and putting herself last. Go Red For Women hopes the film, “Just a Little Heart Attack,” will engage and inspire women to put their health first and take care of their heart.

Check this out.

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