National Military Month

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Welcome 45

Pearl Harbor Day – remember and honor the 2,403 victims who were killed in the Japanese surprise attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941.

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National Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day, which is annually on December 7, commemorates the attack on Pearl Harbor, in Hawaii, during World War II. Many American service men and women lost their lives or were injured on December 7, 1941.

National Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day is also referred to as Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day or Pearl Harbor Day

The attack on Pearl Harbor

On Sunday morning, December 7, 1941, the Imperial Japanese Navy Air Service attacked Naval Station Pearl Harbor in Honululu, Hawaii, without warning and without a declaration of war, killing 2,403 American non-combatants, and injuring 1,178 others. The attack sank two U.S. Navy battleships and damaged five others. It also damaged three cruisers, three destroyers, and one minelayer. Aircraft losses were 188 destroyed and 159 damaged.

Aftermath

Within hours of the attack Canada declared war on Japan,[3] the first Western nation to do so. The following day, the United States declared war on Japan and entered World War II on the side of the Allies. In a speech to Congress, President Franklin Roosevelt called the bombing of Pearl Harbor “a date which will live in infamy.”[2]

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I am a Veteran.

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In the United States, Veterans Day is a federal holiday that is celebrated every 11th of November.


Originally, Veterans Day was called “Armistice Day,” and the date was chosen to commemorate the signing of the armistice with Germany that ended hostilities during World War I.

The armistice, signed on November 11th, 1918, did not officially end that war, however. That came on June 28th, 1919, with the signing of the Treaty of Versailles. On the other hand, since the U.S. never signed the Treaty of Versailles like the other Allies, one could say that for the U.S. at least, the November 11th armistice really did end the war.

At first, the focus of Armistice Day was on the veterans of World War I, though it was always meant to honor all veterans of foreign wars, who risked their lives on the battle field to secure the freedoms of all Americans. Over time, with the passing away of the World War I generation and the coming of new conflicts during World War II, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War, the focus on the 1918 Armistice was lost and the name of the holiday was changed. Additionally, today, Veterans Day is generally regarded as honoring all those who ever served in the U.S. Armed Force rather than only those who actually fought in a war.

In 1919, the first celebration of Armistice Day took place, with Britain and the Allied nations of World War I all observing the day. Business as usual was briefly interrupted at 11am, the time when the armistice was signed with Germany. There were also parades and patriotic gatherings, and red poppies were put on display in many British Commonwealth countries.

Another development took place in 1926, when Congress finally decided to declare that World War I was over. It was odd for this recognition of an existing reality to come seven years late, but without the U.S. agreeing to the Treaty of Versailles, there had been no official end to the war. Congress also made November 11th a day of prayer and thanksgiving and expressed a desire that the U.S. flag be on display during this day and that special ceremonies be held.

Finally, in 1938, Armistice Day became a permanent, official public holiday. Eerily enough, the holiday designed to honor World War I veterans became official only a few years before World War II arrived. The next stage in the history of Veterans Day came in 1954, when it received its present name. Congress made the change when pressed to do so by various private veterans organizations.

A debacle involving Veterans Day came in 1971, when Congress changed the date from November 11th to the fourth Monday in October. This led to chaos because many states refused to recognize the change. Some would be celebrating in November while others did so in October, and the resistance to the date change never broke down. Finally, the date was changed back to November 11th beginning in 1978.

Another interesting Veterans Day “conflict” involves a matter of grammar and spelling. Today, many people spell the holiday as “Veterans’ Day,” but the official government-approved spelling is “Veterans Day.“ The explanation given is that the adjectival spelling instead of the possessive-case spelling shows that the holiday is about honoring veterans rather than a day that belongs to them.

Many observe Veterans Day by simply flying the U.S. flag at their house, having a picnic or cook out with friends and family, and watching war movies or other patriotic programming on TV. Many also donate to veterans’ causes and show appreciation to veterans they meet or are already acquainted with, and some veterans will don their military uniforms on this day, making themselves “easy to spot.”

Happy Birthday you are 241 years old!

Republic of Texas – Remember the Alamo! – The Lone Star State.


When I first joined the military I studied at Ft. Sam Houston. And I have been to the Alamo and have seen the 67 foot statue of him. 

Samuel “Sam” Houston (March 2, 1793 – July 26, 1863) was an American politician and soldier, best known for his role in bringing Texas into the United States as a constituent state. His victory at the Battle of San Jacinto secured the independence of Texas from Mexico in one of the shortest decisive battles in modern history. The only American to be elected governor of two states (as opposed to territories or indirect selection), Houston was also the only governor within a future Confederate state to oppose secession (which led to the outbreak of the American Civil War) and to refuse an oath of allegiance to the Confederacy, a decision that led to his removal from office by the Texas secession convention.

As governor, he refused to swear loyalty to the Confederacy when Texas seceded from the Union in 1861 with the outbreak of the American Civil War, and was removed from office. To avoid bloodshed, he refused an offer of a Union army to put down the Confederate rebellion. Instead, he retired to Huntsville, Texas, where he died before the end of the war.

Houston’s name has been honored in numerous ways. He is the namesake of the city of Houston, Texas’s most populous city and the fourth most populous city in the U.S.. Other things named for Sam Houston include: a memorial museum, five U.S. naval vessels named USS Houston (AK-1, CA-30, CL-81, SSBN-609, and SSN-713), a U.S. Army base, a national forest, a historical park, a university, an elementary school in Lebanon, TN (Sam Houston Elementary) and a prominent roadside statue outside of Huntsville.


Sam Houston and the Battle for Texas Independence 

“Remember the Alamo” is a well-known phrase. Do you know what it means?

Sam Houston had already served in the U.S. House of Representatives and as governor of Tennessee when he moved to Texas in 1832. At the time he arrived, Texas was part of Mexico and the site of rising tensions and violent disturbances between Mexican authorities and Anglo settlers from the United States. Voicing his support for a separate state of Texas, Houston emerged as a leader among the settlers. In 1835, he was chosen commander in chief of the Texas army.

The Alamo was an 18th century Franciscan Mission in San Antonio, Texas, which was the location of an important battle for Texans fighting for independence from Mexico. In 1836, a small group of Texans was defeated by Mexican General Santa Anna.

When Houston received word of the defeat at the Alamo, he was inspired to begin a month-long retreat to regroup and replenish the Texas army’s strength. Remembering how badly the Texans had been defeated at the Alamo, on April 21, 1836, Houston’s army won a quick battle against the Mexican forces at San Jacinto and gained independence for Texas. Soon after, Houston was elected president of the Republic of Texas. He continued to serve as senator and governor after Texas became part of the United States in 1845.

Sam Houston died in 1863 in Huntsville, Texas, where a 67-foot-tall memorial statue of him now stands. After a lifetime of service to his country, the event for which he is most well known is his role in the independence of Texas. 

Agent Orange Awareness Month

AUGUST and OCTOBER are Agent Orange Awareness MonthSEPTEMBER 28, 20132

It’s time once again to observe Agent Orange Awareness Month. Here at Legacy of Our Veterans Military Exposures or lovme we began observing Agent Orange Awareness not only in the month of August but also October. I know it’s confusing to some but here is a little history behind Agent Orange Awareness Month.

My understanding is that most states have designated October as the month of choice but in Maine, where I live, it’s August.

Senator Susan Collins (R-ME) introduced and passed a resolution making August Agent Orange Awareness Month>>>S.Res.248 – A resolution designating the month of August 2009 as “Agent Orange Awareness Month”

FROM SENATOR COLLINS: Increase Agent Orange Awareness (reprinted here with permission)

“Increase Agent Orange Awareness” Weekly Column Senator Susan Collins August 21, 2009 More than 8.7 million American men and women bravely served our nation during the Vietnam War. More than 58,000 gave their lives defending freedom, including 339 from Maine.

Some three and a half decades later, an estimated 2.6 million Vietnam veterans bear an awful legacy from that conflict – severe, debilitating, and even fatal health problems that have resulted from their exposure to the herbicide Agent Orange. Adding to the tragedy is the fact that these health problems at times afflict not only just those who served in Vietnam, but also their children.

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I spent 35 years in a military uniform (Air Force and the Air National Guard) and I stand for the American Flag and National Anthem. Without us you would not have this freedom you have.    

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