Cancer Prevention

Cancer is the general term for more than 100 diseases according to the American Cancer Society (ACS). Although cancers can be found in different places throughout the body, they all begin with abnormal cell growth. Cancer starts when cells in a part of the body grow out of control. These cells multiply and invade into surrounding tissue, something normal cells don’t do. Cancer cells are sometimes inherited (for instance, someone who has a parent with cancer has a greater chance of cancer himself) but more often, a cancer cell is caused by something in the environment, such as cigarette smoking or sun exposure. Left untreated, cancer can cause serious illness and, in most cases, death.

To reduce your risk of cancer don’t smoke, limit sun exposure, be physically active, and eat healthy. There are also screening tests and exams for some types of cancers which can find an abnormality early and before it spreads. In general, the earlier cancer is found, the greater the chance for survival.

The ACS states nearly half of all men and a third of all women in the United States will develop cancer in their lifetime. Fortunately, early detection and treatment of cancer has resulted in more cancer survivors. Ask your doctor what screenings and exams you should have and how often you should get them.

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Living well after 50.

One in eight women will get breast cancer.

National Down Syndrome Month

 

 

Down syndrome is the most common genetic disorder in America.

People with Down syndrome have mild to moderate disabilities.

There are many supportive programs for people with Down syndrome and their families, helping people with Down syndrome to live healthy and fulfilling lives.

 

Down syndrome (sometimes called Down’s syndrome) is a condition in which a child is born with an extra copy of their 21st chromosome (hence its other name, Trisomy 21). This causes physical and mental developmental delays and disabilities.

 

Many of the disabilities are lifelong and they can also shorten life expectancy. However, people with Down syndrome can live healthy and fulfilling lives. Recent medical advances as well as cultural and institutional support for people with Down syndrome and their families provide many opportunities to help overcome challenges.

 

What Causes Down Syndrome?

According to the National Down Syndrome Society (NDSS), about 1 in 700 babies in the United States is born with Down syndrome. It’s the most common genetic disorder in the United States.

 

A quick explanation of basic genetics can help you understand how it happens. In all cases of reproduction, both parents pass their genes on to their children. These genes are carried in chromosomes. When the baby’s cells develop, each cell is supposed to receive 23 pairs of chromosomes (46 chromosomes total). Half of the chromosomes are from the mother and half are from the father.

 

In children with Down syndrome, one of the chromosomes doesn’t separate properly. The baby ends up with three copies, or an extra partial copy, of chromosome 21, instead of two. This extra chromosome causes problems as the brain and physical features develop.

 

Types of Down Syndrome

 

There are three types of Down syndrome:

Trisomy 21

Trisomy 21 means there is an extra copy of chromosome 21 in every cell. This is the most common form of Down syndrome.

Mosaicism

Mosaicism occurs when a child is born with an extra chromosome in some but not all of their cells. People with mosaic Down syndrome tend to have fewer symptoms than those with trisomy 21.

Translocation

In this type of Down syndrome, children have only an extra part of chromosome 21. There are 46 total chromosomes. However, one of them has an extra piece of chromosome 21 attached.

 

Will My Child Be at Risk for Down Syndrome?

Certain parents have a greater risk of giving birth to a child with Down syndrome. Mothers age 35 and older are more likely to have a baby with Down syndrome than younger mothers. The risk increases the older the mother is. Research shows that paternal age also has an effect — one 2003 study found that fathers over 40 had twice the risk of having a child with Down syndrome.

 

Other parents who are at greater risk of having a child with Down syndrome include:

people with a family history of Down syndrome

people who carry the genetic translocation

 

It’s important to remember that no one of these factors mean that you will definitely have a baby with Down syndrome, but statistically and over a large population, they can put you at higher risk.

 

SYMPTOMS

 

What Are the Symptoms of Down Syndrome?

Though the likelihood of carrying a baby with Down syndrome can be estimated by screening during pregnancy, you won’t experience any symptoms of carrying a Down syndrome child.

At birth, babies with Down syndrome usually have certain characteristic signs, including:

flat facial features

small head and ears

short neck

bulging tongue

eyes that slant upward

oddly shaped ears

poor muscle tone

 

An infant with Down syndrome can be born at normal size but will develop more slowly than a child without the condition.

 

People with Down syndrome usually have some degree of mental disability, but it’s often mild to moderate. Mental and social development delays may mean that the child could have:

impulsive behavior

poor judgment

short attention span

slow learning capabilities

 

Medical complications often accompany Down syndrome. These may include:

congenital heart defects

hearing loss

poor vision

cataracts (clouded eyes)

hip problems, such as dislocations

leukemia

chronic constipation

sleep apnea (interrupted breathing during sleep)

dementia (thought and memory problems)

hypothyroidism (low thyroid function)

obesity

late tooth growth, causing problems with chewing

Alzheimer’s, in later life

 

People with Down syndrome are also more prone to infection. They may struggle with respiratory infections, urinary tract infections, and skin infections.

 

Down syndrome is the most common genetic disorder in America.

People with Down syndrome have mild to moderate disabilities.

There are many supportive programs for people with Down syndrome and their families, helping people with Down syndrome to live healthy and fulfilling lives.

Down syndrome (sometimes called Down’s syndrome) is a condition in which a child is born with an extra copy of their 21st chromosome (hence its other name, Trisomy 21). This causes physical and mental developmental delays and disabilities.

Many of the disabilities are lifelong and they can also shorten life expectancy. However, people with Down syndrome can live healthy and fulfilling lives. Recent medical advances as well as cultural and institutional support for people with Down syndrome and their families provide many opportunities to help overcome challenges.

 

 

 

 

 

Check out the National Down Syndrome Society and the National Association for Down Syndrome for help and hope.

Article reso

 

PARENTS START YOUR MINIVANS……… August is Get Ready for Kindergarten Month

by @DreamBox_Learn

How do you get your child ready for the beginning of their academic career? How do you prepare yourself for this life-changing transition?

Prepping for the first school send off

We’ve all seen those movies and T.V. shows where the child clings to his parent’s leg, weeping and refusing to go inside the kindergarten classroom. This emotional exchange can be just as difficult for parents as it is for the kids. That’s why we came up with eight tips to quell your child’s fear to ease them through those big, scary doors. 

1. Read Books
Read books about kindergarten with them, such as The Night Before Kindergarten or First Day Jitters and gently get them familiar with the concept. Storytime is a good way to get your child talking about the new school.

2. Take a walk
Walk with your child by the school, play on the playground, and maybe take him or her inside for a special tour. Research shows that children who have established routine in their lives feel more safe and secure.

3. Sleep Schedule
Adjust their sleep schedule gradually to the school’s schedule.

4. Practice Trip
Take a practice bus trip if your child is going to take the bus to school or point out (and count!) buses you see on the road.

5. Kindergarten math
Being a Mathematics based game company, our desire is for your student to excel in Math. Math can be integrated into many daily activities.  You can start prepping your child for kindergarten with kindergarten-appropriate math games like Uno and number Bingo. Practice counting by asking your child to count the buttons on your shirt, the daisies in your lawn,  the candy in a dish.  Use our Math Development Growth Chart and find out where your five-year-old is in math before school begins.

6. How do parents get ready?
Kids are the ones who have to face a whole new routine, but parents need to prepare too! During the school send off, you’ll probably cry more than the little one.  Invest in a giant pair of sunglasses to hide those tears.  And definitely have a video camera handy. 

7. Questions to ask yourself before your child begins kindergarten:
What forms do you need to fill out?
Do you have a kindergarten yearly calendar and daily schedule?
What are the procedures for getting your child to/from school?
What immunizations are required for school entry?
How do you register?
What’s the principal’s name and the name of the kindergarten teachers?
What is the policy for school snacks and lunches?

August is Children’s Eye Health and Safety Month

With a large number of states beginning the school year earlier, August is the new September! Along with school supply shopping and purchasing those back-to-school clothing items, it’s time to make comprehensive eye exam appointments for the kids. Conveniently, August is designated as Children’s Eye Health and Safety Month!

A good rule of thumb is to have your children’s eyes examined during well-child visits, beginning around age three. Your child’s eye doctor can help detect refractive errors such as nearsightedness, farsightedness and astigmatism as well as the following diseases:
Amblyopia (lazy eye)
Strabismus (crossed eyes)
Ptosis (drooping of the eyelid)
Color deficiency (color blindness)

If you or your doctor suspects that your child may have a vision problem, you can make an appointment with your local ophthalmologist for further testing. There are some specific warning signs that may indicate that your child has a vision problem. Some of these include:
Wandering or crossed eyes
A family history of childhood vision problems
Disinterest in reading or viewing distant objects
Squinting or turning the head in an unusual manner while watching television

Keeping your children’s eyes safe is another part of maintaining healthy vision. Eye injuries are the leading cause of vision loss in children. There are about 42,000 sports-related eye injuries every year in America, and children suffer most of these injuries. Help prevent your child from being one of the more than 12 million children who suffer from vision impairment by remembering a few basic rules of safety:
All children should wear protective eyewear while participating in sports or recreational activities

Purchase age-appropriate toys for your children and avoid toys with sharp or protruding parts (Source: HAP).

Help your children have a successful school year by scheduling a comprehensive eye exam and taking safety measures to ensure their eyes are free from injury. If you need assistance finding a licensed eye care specialist in your area, click here.
 

Vaccines aren’t just for children!

Immunizations aren’t just for infants and children. Adults need them too. Some immunizations you received as a child can wear off. You may also be at risk for vaccine-preventable diseases due to your age, job, lifestyle, travel, or health conditions. Prevent getting and spreading serious diseases by staying up to date with your immunizations.

Happy 4th of July!!

Image

July Fun Facts

The 7th month of the year brings us Independence Day and Canada Day.

In the Georgian calendar, the calendar that most of the world uses, July is the seventh month. However, on the Roman calendar, it was actually the fifth month and was call Quintilis, which meant fifth. Later in 46 B.C., Caesar gave 31 days and the Roman Senates named the month Julius in honor of Caesar. In northern hemisphere, July is usually the hottest month of the year when it is actually a winter time in southern hemisphere. It gets very cold in Antarctica and cold and rainy in South America. Because there isn’t much rain in July, the grass loses its greenness. Moreover, the abundance of flowers and insects occur in July.

Below are some fun facts about July:

  1. The birthstone for July is the Ruby.
  2. The zodiac signs for July are Cancer (June 21 – July 22) and Leo (July 23 – August 22)
  3. The birth flower for July is the water lily.
  4. The month of July was named after Julius Caesar.
  5. On July 1, 1867, the Dominion of Canada was established due to the British North America Act.
  6. On July 1, 1898, the San Juan Hill was occupied by the American troops during the Spanish-American War.
  7. During World War I on July 1, 1916, the Battle of Somme began.
  8. On July 2, 1881, President James Garfield was killed by Charles Guiteau.
  9. On July 2, 1890, the Sherman Antitrust Act (an Act to prohibit trusts) was passed by the United States Congress.
  10. On July 5, 1971, Amendment 26 was proclaimed which set the voting age at 18 in the United States.
  11. On July 6, 1854, the Republican Party held its first state convention at Jackson, Michigan.
  12. On July 11, 1804, during a duel between Aaron Burr and Alexander Hamilton, Hamilton was killed.
  13. The 38th President of the United States, Gerald R. Ford, was born on July 1, 1913.
  14. On July 16, 1790, District of Columbia was established.
  15. The first atomic bomb was set off by scientists in Alamogordo, New Mexico on July 16, 1945.
  16. National Blueberry Month
  17. National Ice Cream Month
  18. National Hot Dog Month
  19. July 1 – Canada Day
  20. July 4 – Independence Day

Happy Father’s Day

History of Father’s Day

It would be interesting to know how Father’s Day came into practice and celebrated worldwide with an equal sincerity and respect as any other significant holidays. Here’s a short history on the holiday, and meaning of the different colors of roses to be worn that Day. Get to know what are the truest reasons associated for the celebration of this special celebration. You may even refer the page to others to share the information by clicking on the link given below.

 

father's day historyThere are many theories associated with the observance of Father’s Day; the two theories which are quite known prevalent for the celebration of the first Father’s Day celebration in the United States are as stated. The first theory to regarding the celebration of Father’s Day was established on June 19, 1908 in the State of Washington when an independent celebration of Father’s Day, a few weeks later, took place on 5th July, 1908 in Fairmont, West Virginia.

Hence the first Father’s Day was recognized in West Virginia, while a church service was going on at Williams Memorial Methodist Episcopal Church South. Grace Golden Clayton, who reportedly suggested the service to the pastor at Williams Memorial, is said to have been inspired to celebrate fathers post a mine explosion, a few months before, in the nearby community of Monongah. This explosion ended 361 lives, many of them fathers and recent immigrants to the States from Italy.

Another influencing force which further reinforced the establishment of Father’s Day was that of Mrs. Sonora Smart Dodd. Dodd thought of the idea for Father’s Day while listening to a Mother’s Day sermon in 1909. Having been raised by her father, Henry Jackson Smart, after her mother died, Sonora wanted her father to know how special he was to her. It was her father that made all the parental sacrifices and was, in the eyes of his daughter, a courageous, selfless, and loving man. Hence, since Sonora’s father was born in June, so she chose to hold the first Father’s Day celebration in Spokane in June. Although she initially thought of celebrating Father’s Day on June 5 in Spokane (which was her father’s birthday), the other people involved did not agree they would have enough time for an appropriate celebration. Thus, the first Father’s Day was held instead on the third Sunday in the month of June. The first June Father’s Day was celebrated on 19th June, 1908, in Spokane, WA, at the Spokane YMCA. Politician and orator, William Jennings Bryan appreciated the concept immediately and began extending his support widely. Father’s Day was then initiated by President Woodrow Wilson, who was the first U.S. President to celebrate it on June 1916, a party his family hosted. President Calvin Coolidge declared it a national holiday in 1924. In 1966, President Lyndon Johnson, by official order, made Father’s Day a holiday to be celebrated on the third Sunday of June. The holiday was not formally considered until 1972, when it was officially acknowledged by a Congressional Act setting it permanently on the third Sunday in June all over the nation.

Read more at http://www.theholidayspot.com/fathersday/history.htm#OZgRbT5UFOVeE63s.99

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