WHAT you need to know

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STROKE AWARENESS MONTH

Stroke AwarenessMay is American Stroke Month, and to show our support we are wearing red and challenge you to join us and share your photo on Facebook. 

Our goal this month is to raise awareness on risk factors and diseases which can lead to stroke and encourage you to evaluate your own personal risk for such diseases, including carotid artery disease and atrial fibrillation.

We have put together some information on stroke and prevention to share with you throughout the month. Here are a few quick facts on stroke, but be sure to check back each week to learn more!


Quick Facts on Stroke

Stroke is the number 5 cause of death and leading cause of disability in the U.S.1, making it a serious condition.

Studies show that almost 80% of all strokes are preventable and nearly 85% of all strokes that occur show NO warning signs.
Risk Factors 

Risk factors may be hereditary, due to lifestyle choices, health conditions or a combination of all. Some common risk factors that can lead to stroke include:

Family History

Smoking

High blood pressure

High cholesterol

Diseases

Certain diseases or health conditions may increase your risk for stroke, including:

Carotid Artery Disease

Atrial Fibrillation

Diabetes

Heart Disease

Learn more about stroke risk factors and disease that can lead to stroke.

Stroke Prevention

The important thing to remember is there are ways you can minimize your risk of stroke, including:

Healthy lifestyle choices

Proper management of health conditions, like high blood pressure

Knowing and understanding your risks and health

For more information on stroke prevention visit, CDC Preventing Stroke: What You Can Do. – See more at: http://www.lifelinescreening.com/Community/Health-Facts/Health-News/American-Stroke-Awareness-Month

Happy Mom’s Day

Mother’s Day is a holiday honoring motherhood that is observed in different forms throughout the world. The American incarnation of Mother’s Day was created by Anna Jarvis in 1908 and became an official U.S. holiday in 1914. Jarvis would later denounce the holiday’s commercialization and spent the latter part of her life trying to remove it from the calendar. While dates and celebrations vary, Mother’s Day most commonly falls on the second Sunday in May and traditionally involves presenting mothers with flowers, cards and other gifts.

Celebrations of mothers and motherhood can be traced back to the ancient Greeks and Romans, who held festivals in honor of the mother goddesses Rhea and Cybele, but the clearest modern precedent for Mother’s Day is the early Christian festival known as “Mothering Sunday.”

Once a major tradition in the United Kingdom and parts of Europe, this celebration fell on the fourth Sunday in Lent and was originally seen as a time when the faithful would return to their “mother church”—the main church in the vicinity of their home—for a special service.

Over time the Mothering Sunday tradition shifted into a more secular holiday, and children would present their mothers with flowers and other tokens of appreciation. This custom eventually faded in popularity before merging with the American Mother’s Day in the 1930s and 1940s.

DID YOU KNOW?

More phone calls are made on Mother’s Day than any other day of the year. These holiday chats with Mom often cause phone traffic to spike by as much as 37 percent.

ANN REEVES JARVIS AND JULIA WARD HOWE

The origins of Mother’s Day as celebrated in the United States date back to the 19th century. In the years before the Civil War, Ann Reeves Jarvis of West Virginia helped start “Mothers’ Day Work Clubs” to teach local women how to properly care for their children.

These clubs later became a unifying force in a region of the country still divided over the Civil War. In 1868 Jarvis organized “Mothers’ Friendship Day,” at which mothers gathered with former Union and Confederate soldiers to promote reconciliation.

Another precursor to Mother’s Day came from the abolitionist and suffragette Julia Ward Howe. In 1870 Howe wrote the “Mother’s Day Proclamation,” a call to action that asked mothers to unite in promoting world peace. In 1873 Howe campaigned for a “Mother’s Peace Day” to be celebrated every June 2.

Other early Mother’s Day pioneers include Juliet Calhoun Blakely, a temperance activist who inspired a local Mother’s Day in Albion, Michigan, in the 1870s. The duo of Mary Towles Sasseen and Frank Hering, meanwhile, both worked to organize a Mothers’ Day in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Some have even called Hering “the father of Mothers’ Day.

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Last Hindenburg survivor, 88, recalls: ‘The air was on fire’Published May 05, 2017 Associated Press

TRENTON, N.J. – Thunderstorms and wind had delayed the Hindenburg’s arrival in New Jersey from Germany on May 6, 1937. The father of 8-year-old Werner Doehner headed to his cabin after using his movie camera to shoot some scenes of Lakehurst Naval Air Station from the airship’s dining room.


FILE – In this May 6, 1937 file photo, the German dirigible Hindenburg crashes to earth in flames after exploding at the U.S. Naval Station in Lakehurst, N.J. Only one person is left of the 62 passengers and crew who survived when the Hindenburg burst into flames 80 years ago Saturday, May 6, 2017. Werner Doehner was 8 years old when he boarded the zeppelin with his parents and older siblings after their vacation to Germany in 1937. The 88-year-old now living in Parachute, Colo., tells The Associated Press that the airship pitched as it tried to land in New Jersey and that “suddenly the air was on fire.” (AP Photo/Murray Becker, File) (1937 AP)

“We didn’t see him again,” recalled Doehner, now 88 and the only person left of the 62 passengers and crew who survived the fire that killed his father, sister and 34 other souls 80 years ago Saturday.

Doehner and his parents, older brother and sister were returning from a vacation in Germany and planned to travel on the 804-foot-long Hindenburg to Lakehurst, then fly to Newark and board a train in nearby New York City to take them home to Mexico City, where Doehner’s father was a pharmaceutical executive.

The children would have preferred the decks and public rooms of an ocean liner because space was tight on the airship, Doehner said in a rare telephone interview this week with The Associated Press from his home in Parachute, Colorado.

Their mother brought games to keep the children busy. They toured the control car and the catwalks inside the hydrogen-filled Hindenburg. They could see an ice field as they crossed the Atlantic Ocean, he remembered.

As the Hindenburg arrived at its destination, flames began to flicker on top of the ship.
Hydrogen, exposed to air, fueled an inferno. The front section of the Hindenburg pitched up and the back section pitched down.

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May Fun Facts

The 5th month of the year brings us Memorial Day, Mother’s Day, and the last full month of Spring.

According to the early Roman calendar, May was the third month. Later, the ancient Romans used January as the first month and therefore, became the fifth month and it always had 31 days. May was first named for Maia, the Roman goddess of spring and growth. In the North Temperate Zone, may is one of the most beautiful months of the year. Usually, the snow and ice are gone by this time but the hot temperature hasn’t arrived yet. In May, the first garden begins to sprout and the wild flowers start to bloom and the trees and grasses turn green. Wild flowers such as forsythia, dogwood, violets, and jack-in-the-box bloom and many birds build their nests to sit on the eggs that will soon hatch.

Below are some fun facts about May:

  1. The birthstone for May is the emerald which represents success or love.
  2. The zodiac sign for May are Taurus (April 20 – May 20) and Gemini (May 21 – June 20)
  3. The birth flower for May is the Crataegus monogyna and the Lily of the Valley.
  4. On May 1, 1931, the Empire State Building was officially opened.
  5. Armed Forces Day – celebrated the third Saturday of May
  6. Mother’s Day – celebrated on the second Sunday of May
  7. Memorial Day – celebrated on the last Monday in May.
  8. May 5 – Cinco De Mayo
  9. On the first Saturday in May, the Kentucky Derby takes place.
  10. On May 11, 1858, Minnesota was admitted to the Union.
  11. On May 14, 1804, Lewis and Clark, the great explorers began their trip up the Missouri River.
  12. On May 14, 1948, the last British troops left Palestine which led to Israel becoming an independent country.
  13. On May 15, 1918, the first regular airmail service began in the United States.
  14. On May 20, 1862, Abraham Lincoln signed the Homestead Act.
  15. On May 20, 1932, the first solo flight by a woman across the Atlantic Ocean was made by Amelia Earhart.
  16. On May 23, 1788, South Carolina became the eighth state.
  17. On May 24, 1607, the first permanent English settlement in America was established in Jamestown, VA.
  18. On May 27, 1937, the Golden Gate Bridge was opened in San Francisco.
  19. On May 29, 1790, Rhode Island became the 13th state.
  20. On May 29, 1848, Wisconsin became the 30th state.

A-U-T-I-S-M

The aim of this month is educate the public about autism. Autism is a complex mental condition and developmental disability, characterized by difficulties in the way a person communicates and interacts with other people. Autism can be present from birth or form during early childhood (typically within the first three years). Autism is a lifelong developmental disability with no single known cause.
A – Always

U – Unique

T – Totally

I – Interesting

S – Sometimes

M – Mysterious

April is Autism Month

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Happy Birthday Dr. Seuss 

Happy Birthday Dr. Seuss

Today is the birthday of Dr. Seuss. Born in 1904, he wrote 44 books for children and was a genius with the rhythm and creativity of language. Dr. Seuss knew how to engage the minds of children without being condescending or boring. I’m pretty sure he would not have been a fan of how we introduce children to reading these days.

As part of celebrating Dr. Seuss’s birthday, I hope our schools will be able to take time away from standardized testing and their  curricula to celebrate the imagination, creativity, and fun that are synonymous with Dr. Seuss. Even though there are no standardized test items on his poetic use of language and whimsical characters, there are great lessons to be learned from his books.

Green Eggs and Ham, despite what Ted Cruz said, tells us to try something new as we may find we like it.

The Lorax teaches children about the importance of respecting their environment.

Horton Hatches the Egg illustrates the virtues of fairness and being faithful to one’s promises.

Oh the Places You’ll Go reassures graduates from nursery school to college and beyond that they have the brains and ability to succeed, even if there are obstacles to overcome.

Yertle the Turtle warns of the consequences of trying to get above everyone else at the expense of those below you, perhaps a good lesson on income inequality.

As we force young children to plow through boring leveled readers, often at an age when they are not developmentally ready to read, we should think about the way Dr. Seuss approached children’s literature. When an educational expert challenged him to write a book to help children learn how to read, using a list of 300 words that most first-graders (note: not kindergarteners or preschoolers) knew back in 1957, two words on the list jumped out at him: “cat” and “hat.” Guess what he wrote. The Cat in the Hat is 1,702 words long, but uses only 220 different words. Brilliant.

In 1960, Seuss bet a friend he could write a book using only 50 different words. The result was Green Eggs and Ham. Not only did he use exactly 50 different words, but except for “anywhere,” all of those words had one syllable. For years, that has instinctively been my go-to book to read with young children. It took the genius of Dr. Seuss to combine a simple vocabulary with the repetition and humor children adore.

My own children grew up on heavy doses of Dr. Seuss. At some point, each of them was able to read those books themselves. It didn’t take long for them to figure out they could actually read Hop on Pop. Maybe they memorized it at first, but thinking you can read a familiar book and being able to correctly point to many of the words is a huge first step to reading. Dr. Seuss understood that by exposing kids to interesting books, they would learn to read when their brains were ready.

One thing I know for sure is that Dr. Seuss appreciated creativity and individual differences. Among the many wonderful things he wrote, here are a few of my favorites:

“I like nonsense, it wakes up the brain cells. Fantasy is a necessary ingredient in living.”

“Think and wonder, wonder and think.”

“There’s no limit to how much you’ll know, depending how far beyond zebra you go.”

“Children’s reading and children’s thinking are the rock-bottom base upon which this country will rise. Or not rise. “

“Children want the same things we want. To laugh, to be challenged, to be entertained and delighted.”

You were not born to just fit in, you were born to stand out!”

So today, let’s honor Dr. Seuss by acknowledging children’s creative thinking, wide-ranging interests, and unique styles of learning. These days, facts are literally at our fingertips, so rote memorization and boring worksheets make no sense. Children need to know what questions they should plug into their search engines and how to use the facts they uncover to take them in new directions. As Dr. Seuss wisely said, “It is better to know how to learn than to know.”

Laurie Levy, Contributor

Sharing insights & personal experiences on education, aging, special needs advocacy, community, love, kindness, caring, & acceptance.

There are over 120 types of Cancer

Cancer-Ribbons

Types of Cancer

Cancer.Net  offers individualized guides for more than 120 types of cancer and related hereditary syndromes. Each guide provides comprehensive, oncologist-approved information on: Overview, Medical Illustrations, Risk Factors, Prevention, Symptoms & Signs, Diagnosis, Stages, Treatment Options, About Clinical Trials, Coping with Side Effects, After Treatment, Latest Research, Questions to Ask the Doctor, and Additional Resources

The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) believes that all treatment decisions should be made between patients and their doctors.

Learn more about the different Cancers.

Learn more about Cancer treatment.

Warning Signs in Women

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