Weekly Photo Challenge-Transient

Transient

Drifters, nomads, and even the state of impermanence: this week, share your photos of transient.

Whether washed ashore, floating on air, at the mercy of ocean currents, or wandering the earth, passers-through captivate me. When I find driftwood on the beach, I think about its adventures. How many storms at sea did it endure? How many birds took rest on it as it bobbed in the open ocean? It was once rich brown and rough with bark, and now it’s sun-bleached and smooth as satin. Where did it come from? How far did it travel? What stories would it tell if it could talk, and how long before it will move on again?

Day 2 Street -Developing your Eye

 

Day 2 Street Page Visit the resource page

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Day Two: “Street” — Establishing Shot

Yesterday, we asked you to interpret home in your own way. Today, let’s focus on a street. It can be a quiet road blanketed in snow, an alley covered with murals, or a busy avenue where pedestrians weave between cars and motorbikes.

Wander your neighborhood — or someplace new — to capture your street snapshot.

Today’s Tip: While you’re free to take a picture from any angle, try to capture an establishing shot: a wide-angle photo that sets up a scene. You may need to back up a few steps, or climb some stairs to higher ground to fit the whole scene in one shot.

Visit the resource page for details on taking a wide shot. Remember to tag your post with #developingyoureye and check the Reader to see posts from fellow course participants

My Pic of the Week

I love to travel the world and with my husband. We just took a transatlantic cruise in April. This is the Flemish Country side.

 

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Day 1 Home-Developing Your Eye

When I think of home I see the Mackinaw Bridge because I live in the upper lower of Michigan. The bridge is 5 miles long and it connects to upper Michigan. Also lakes are a big part of Michigan, I live across the street from Lake Huron.

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Emancipation Proclamation

 

19th of June is known as Juneteenth, an African-American holiday begun at the end of slavery days. Its origins are Texan, not Louisianan, but Juneteenth has long had strong roots in the South and has since spread all over the country as a time for African-Americans to commemorate their freedom and accomplishments.

The forgotten legend behind the world’s most famous tongue twister.

FeaturedInstant ArticlesNewsAug 26, 2016 Ian Harvey


For most of us, tongue twisters are simply an amusing childish wordplay. Nevertheless, little did we know there was quite some significant history behind one of the world’s most famous tongue twisters of all.

“She sells seashells by the seashore” this tongue twister take us back to the 19th century when the woman referred to simply as “she” was a real person, and carried the name of Mary Anning.

Anning was born on 21 May 1799, in Dorset, southwest of England. Her family had a rather unusual way of earning money for living. It involved digging up fossils and selling them to people who visited the coast. Although this might sound strange, but back in the 19th century, rich and middle-class people loved having curio cabinets as showpieces in their living rooms. These cabinets were often decorated with various natural relics including fossils, most of them souvenirs brought from abroad.


Portrait of Mary Anning with her dog Tray – Natural History Museum, London

Drawing of Mary Anning’s house in Lyme Regis, Dorset, England.

More

June Fun Facts

The 6th month of the year brings us Summer, Father’s Day, Flag Day, and the Summer Solstice.

In the Georgian calendar, the calendar that most of the world uses, June is the sixth month. However, according to the early Roman calendar, June was actually the fourth month and had only 29 day. In 46B.C, Julius Caesar gave June 30 days instead of 29 when he reformed the Roman calendar. June was named after the Roman goddess Juno, who is the wife of Jupiter. However, others say that its name actually came from the Latin word iuniors. It means the younger ones, which is opposed to majors or elders which May’s name was originated from. In June, spring ends and summer begins in the Northern Hemisphere. During this time, all the flowers and plants are very beautiful. In the southern hemisphere, winter begins in June.

Below are some fun facts about June:

  1. The birthstones for June are the pearl, alexandrite, and moonstone.
  2. The birth flower for June is the rose.
  3. The zodiac signs for June are Gemini (May 21 – June 20) and Cancer (June 21 – July 22)
  4. On June 1, 1792, the state of Kentucky, also known as the Bluegrass state, became the 15th state of the United States.
  5. On June 1, 1796, Tennessee, also known as The Volunteer State became the 16th state of the United States.
  6. On June 5, 1947, George C. Marshall, the Secretary of State, described the Marshall Plan.
  7. On June 14, 1777, the flag of the United States was adopted by the Continental Congress.
  8. June 14, 1900 – Hawaii was organized as a territory
  9. On June 15, 1215, the Magna Carta was granted by King John.
  10. On June 15, 1775, George Washington was appointed the commander in chief of the Continental Army.
  11. On June 15, 1836, Arkansas also known as the Natural State, became the 25th state of the United States.
  12. Finland’s Flag Day is celebrated on the Saturday closest to June 24.
  13. On June 6th, Sweden celebrates its national holiday, Flag Day.
  14. On June 12, The Philippines’ Independence Day is celebrated.
  15. On June 18, 1812, the United States declared war on Great Britain.
  16. National Candy Month
  17. National Dairy Month
  18. National Iced Tea Month
  19. June 5 – World Environment Day
  20. June 20 – Father’s Day

My Pic of the Week

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Happy Father’s Day

History of Father’s Day

It would be interesting to know how Father’s Day came into practice and celebrated worldwide with an equal sincerity and respect as any other significant holidays. Here’s a short history on the holiday, and meaning of the different colors of roses to be worn that Day. Get to know what are the truest reasons associated for the celebration of this special celebration. You may even refer the page to others to share the information by clicking on the link given below.

 

father's day historyThere are many theories associated with the observance of Father’s Day; the two theories which are quite known prevalent for the celebration of the first Father’s Day celebration in the United States are as stated. The first theory to regarding the celebration of Father’s Day was established on June 19, 1908 in the State of Washington when an independent celebration of Father’s Day, a few weeks later, took place on 5th July, 1908 in Fairmont, West Virginia.

Hence the first Father’s Day was recognized in West Virginia, while a church service was going on at Williams Memorial Methodist Episcopal Church South. Grace Golden Clayton, who reportedly suggested the service to the pastor at Williams Memorial, is said to have been inspired to celebrate fathers post a mine explosion, a few months before, in the nearby community of Monongah. This explosion ended 361 lives, many of them fathers and recent immigrants to the States from Italy.

Another influencing force which further reinforced the establishment of Father’s Day was that of Mrs. Sonora Smart Dodd. Dodd thought of the idea for Father’s Day while listening to a Mother’s Day sermon in 1909. Having been raised by her father, Henry Jackson Smart, after her mother died, Sonora wanted her father to know how special he was to her. It was her father that made all the parental sacrifices and was, in the eyes of his daughter, a courageous, selfless, and loving man. Hence, since Sonora’s father was born in June, so she chose to hold the first Father’s Day celebration in Spokane in June. Although she initially thought of celebrating Father’s Day on June 5 in Spokane (which was her father’s birthday), the other people involved did not agree they would have enough time for an appropriate celebration. Thus, the first Father’s Day was held instead on the third Sunday in the month of June. The first June Father’s Day was celebrated on 19th June, 1908, in Spokane, WA, at the Spokane YMCA. Politician and orator, William Jennings Bryan appreciated the concept immediately and began extending his support widely. Father’s Day was then initiated by President Woodrow Wilson, who was the first U.S. President to celebrate it on June 1916, a party his family hosted. President Calvin Coolidge declared it a national holiday in 1924. In 1966, President Lyndon Johnson, by official order, made Father’s Day a holiday to be celebrated on the third Sunday of June. The holiday was not formally considered until 1972, when it was officially acknowledged by a Congressional Act setting it permanently on the third Sunday in June all over the nation.

Read more at http://www.theholidayspot.com/fathersday/history.htm#OZgRbT5UFOVeE63s.99

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