My grandma always said March comes like a Lion and out like a Lamb

March brings with it the promise of gardening and warm(er), sunny days, as Earth turns its frostbitten cheek to winter and springs forth from the vernal equinox. Read about this month’s holidays, happenings, seasonal recipes, gardening tips, Moon phases, folklore, and much more!

In come the March winds,
They blow and blow,
They sweep up the brown leaves
That green ones may grow.

–George Washington Wright Houghton, American poet (1850–91)

March Calendar

The month of March was named for the Roman god of war, Mars. Traditionally, this was the time of year to resume military campaigns that had been interrupted by winter.

  • International Women’s Day is celebrated on March 8!
  • March has two full Moons this year! The first full Moon, the Full Worm Moon, occurs on the 1st at 7:51 P.M. EST. The second, the Full Sap Moon (also a Blue Moon), occurs on the 31st at 8:37 A.M. EDT. Click here to learn more about March’s Full Moons.
  • Daylight Saving Time begins on Sunday, March 11, at 2:00 A.M. Don’t forget to set your clocks forward! See more details about Daylight Saving Time.
  • St. Patrick’s Day is March 17. It falls on a Saturday this year. Read more about St. Patrick’s Day.
  • The Ides of March falls on March 15, and has long been considered an ill-fated day. Beware the Ides of March!
  • The vernal equinox, also called the Spring Equinox, marking the beginning of spring in the Northern Hemisphere, occurs on Tuesday, March 20 at 12:15 P.M. EDT. On this day, the Sun rises due east and sets due west. In the Southern Hemisphere, this date marks the autumnal equinox. Read more about the First Day of Spring!
  • According to lore, the last three days of March have a reputation for being stormy. Read about the Borrowing Days.
  • Easter Sunday arrives on April 1, 2018, culminating the Holy Week for Christian churches and commemorating the resurrection of Jesus Christ. Read more about Easter Sunday and why the date changes every year.

I will never forget this day.

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration – NASA family lost seven of its own on the morning of January 28, 1986, when a booster engine failed, causing the Shuttle Challenger to break apart just 73 seconds after launch. Today the nation reflects and remembers those brave souls that we lost 27 years ago.

Happy Thanksgiving from my Family to Yours.



To You and Yours



Enjoy your Turkey


Great American Smokeout



The Great American Smokeout

The American Cancer Society marks the Great American Smokeout on the third Thursday of November each year by encouraging smokers to use the date to make a plan to quit, or to plan in advance and quit smoking that day. By quitting — even for one day — smokers will be taking an important step towards a healthier life – one that can lead to reducing cancer risk.

Tobacco use remains the single largest preventable cause of disease and premature death in the US, yet about 42 million Americans still smoke cigarettes — a bit under 1 in every 5 adults. As of 2012, there were also 13.4 million cigar smokers in the US, and 2.3 million who smoke tobacco in pipes — other dangerous and addictive forms of tobacco.

Why World Day of Remembrance?


The World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims (WDR) is observed on the third Sunday of November each year by an increasing number of countries on every continent around the world. This day is dedicated to remembering the many millions killed or injured in road crashes and their families and communities, as well as to pay tribute to the dedicated emergency crews, police and medical professionals who daily deal with the traumatic aftermath of road death and injury.

Why is there a need for this day?

Road deaths and injuries are sudden, violent, traumatic events, the impact of which is long-lasting, often permanent. Each year, millions of newly injured and bereaved people from every corner of the world are added to the countless millions already suffering as the result of a road crash.

The burden of grief and distress experienced by this huge number of people is all the greater because many of the victims are young, because many of the crashes could and should have been prevented and because the response to road death and injury and to victims and families is often inadequate, unsympathetic, and inappropriate to the loss of life or quality of life.

This special Remembrance Day is intended to respond to the great need of road crash victims for public recognition of their loss and suffering (see Messages & Thoughts from victims).

Veterans Day

Veterans Day is an official United States federal holiday that is observed annually on November 11, honoring people who have served in the U.S. Armed Forces, also known as veterans. It coincides with other holidays including Armistice Day and Remembrance Day, which are celebrated in other parts of the world and also mark the anniversary of the end of World War I (major hostilities of World War I were formally ended at the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month of 1918, when the Armistice with Germany went into effect). The United States also originally observed Armistice Day; it then evolved into the current Veterans Day holiday in 1954.

Veterans Day is not to be confused with Memorial Day; Veterans Day celebrates the service of all U.S. military veterans, while Memorial Day is a day of remembering the men and women who gave their lives and those who perished while in service.[1]


Military Family Month



Each year the President signs a proclamation declaring November Military Family Month. This annual proclamation marks the beginning of a month-long celebration of the Military Family in which the Department of Defense and the nation will honor the commitment and sacrifices made by the families of the nation’s service members.

For more information

Alzheimer’s in the United States

Just a few facts.

  • 1-in-9 Americans over 65 has Alzheimer’s disease. (Alzheimer’s Association)
  • When the first wave of baby boomers reaches age 85 (in 2031), it is projected that more than 3 million people age 85 and older will have Alzheimer’s. (Alzheimer’s Association)
  • One third of Americans over age 85 are afflicted with the illness. (Alzheimer’s Association)
  • 5.2 million Americans are living with Alzheimer’s disease. (Alzheimer’s Association)
  • Unless a cure is found, more than 13 million Americans will have the disease by 2050. (Alzheimer’s Association)
  • Alzheimer’s disease is the 6th leading cause of death in America. (Centers for Disease Control)1-in-3 seniors die with Alzheimer’s or another kind of dementia. (Centers for Disease Control)
  • Typical life expectancy after an Alzheimer’s diagnosis is 4-to-8 years. (Alzheimer’s Association)
  • In 2014, the 85-years-and-older population includes about 2 million people with Alzheimer’s disease, or 40 percent of all people with Alzheimer’s age 65 and older. (Alzheimer’s Association)
  • By 2050, there could be as many as 7 million people age 85 and older with Alzheimer’s disease, accounting for half (51 percent) of all people 65 and older with Alzheimer’s. (Alzheimer’s Association)
  • Proportion of People With Alzheimer’s Disease in the United States by Age: (Alzheimer’s Association) 85+ years – 38%,  75-84 years, 44%, 65-74 years, 15%, <65 years, 4%



The Facts

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