The forgotten legend behind the world’s most famous tongue twister.

FeaturedInstant ArticlesNewsAug 26, 2016 Ian Harvey


For most of us, tongue twisters are simply an amusing childish wordplay. Nevertheless, little did we know there was quite some significant history behind one of the world’s most famous tongue twisters of all.

“She sells seashells by the seashore” this tongue twister take us back to the 19th century when the woman referred to simply as “she” was a real person, and carried the name of Mary Anning.

Anning was born on 21 May 1799, in Dorset, southwest of England. Her family had a rather unusual way of earning money for living. It involved digging up fossils and selling them to people who visited the coast. Although this might sound strange, but back in the 19th century, rich and middle-class people loved having curio cabinets as showpieces in their living rooms. These cabinets were often decorated with various natural relics including fossils, most of them souvenirs brought from abroad.


Portrait of Mary Anning with her dog Tray – Natural History Museum, London

Drawing of Mary Anning’s house in Lyme Regis, Dorset, England.

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June Fun Facts

The 6th month of the year brings us Summer, Father’s Day, Flag Day, and the Summer Solstice.

In the Georgian calendar, the calendar that most of the world uses, June is the sixth month. However, according to the early Roman calendar, June was actually the fourth month and had only 29 day. In 46B.C, Julius Caesar gave June 30 days instead of 29 when he reformed the Roman calendar. June was named after the Roman goddess Juno, who is the wife of Jupiter. However, others say that its name actually came from the Latin word iuniors. It means the younger ones, which is opposed to majors or elders which May’s name was originated from. In June, spring ends and summer begins in the Northern Hemisphere. During this time, all the flowers and plants are very beautiful. In the southern hemisphere, winter begins in June.

Below are some fun facts about June:

  1. The birthstones for June are the pearl, alexandrite, and moonstone.
  2. The birth flower for June is the rose.
  3. The zodiac signs for June are Gemini (May 21 – June 20) and Cancer (June 21 – July 22)
  4. On June 1, 1792, the state of Kentucky, also known as the Bluegrass state, became the 15th state of the United States.
  5. On June 1, 1796, Tennessee, also known as The Volunteer State became the 16th state of the United States.
  6. On June 5, 1947, George C. Marshall, the Secretary of State, described the Marshall Plan.
  7. On June 14, 1777, the flag of the United States was adopted by the Continental Congress.
  8. June 14, 1900 – Hawaii was organized as a territory
  9. On June 15, 1215, the Magna Carta was granted by King John.
  10. On June 15, 1775, George Washington was appointed the commander in chief of the Continental Army.
  11. On June 15, 1836, Arkansas also known as the Natural State, became the 25th state of the United States.
  12. Finland’s Flag Day is celebrated on the Saturday closest to June 24.
  13. On June 6th, Sweden celebrates its national holiday, Flag Day.
  14. On June 12, The Philippines’ Independence Day is celebrated.
  15. On June 18, 1812, the United States declared war on Great Britain.
  16. National Candy Month
  17. National Dairy Month
  18. National Iced Tea Month
  19. June 5 – World Environment Day
  20. June 20 – Father’s Day

My Pic of the Week

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Wordless Wednesday 

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I am the Flag….

Flag Day   June 14, 2017
I am the Flag


I am the flag of the United States of America.

My name is Old Glory.

I fly atop the world’s tallest buildings.

I stand watch in America’s halls of justice.

I fly majestically over institutions of learning.

I stand guard with power in the world.

Look up … and see me.
I stand for peace, honor, truth and justice.

I stand for freedom.

I am confident.

I am arrogant.

I am proud.
When I am flown with my fellow banners,

my head is a little higher,

my colors a little truer.
I bow to no one!

I am recognized all over the world.

I am worshiped

I am saluted.

I am loved

I am revered.

I am respected

and I am feared.
I have fought in every battle of every war

for more then 200 years.

I was flown at Valley Forge,

Gettysburg, Shiloh and Appomattox.

I was there at San Juan Hill,

the trenches of France,

in the Argonne Forest,

Anzio, Rome, and the beaches of Normandy.

Guam, Okinawa, Korea and

KheSan, Saigon, Vietnam know me.

I was there.
I led my troops.

I was dirty, battle worn and tired,

but my soldiers cheered me

And I was proud.

I have been burned, torn and trampled

on the streets of countries I have helped set free.

It does not hurt, for I am invincible.
I have been soiled upon, burned, torn

and trampled on the streets of my country.

And when it’s by those whom I’ve served in battle..it hurts.

But I shall overcome..for I am strong.
I have slipped the bonds of Earth

and stood watch over the uncharted frontiers of space

from my vantage point on the moon.

I have borne silent witness

to all of America’s finest hours.

But my finest hours are yet to come.
When I am torn into strips and used as bandages

for my wounded comrades on the battlefield,

When I am flown at half-mast to honor my soldier,

Or when I lie in the trembling arms of a grieving parent

at the grave of their fallen son or daughter,

I am proud.
My name is ‘Old Glory’!

Long may I wave

o’er the land of the free

and the home of the brave.
Publisher :- Howard Schnauber

Red Rose Day

Date When Celebrated : Always June 12

Red Rose Day is a time to enjoy and appreciate America’s favorite flower…..the red rose. A red rose signifies love. A June setting for Red Rose Day is very appropriate, as this is by far the most popular month for weddings. And, they are in bloom in the gardens across America this month.

In addition to being the most popular cut flower, roses are also the most popular flower in flower beds and around foundation of houses, garages and sheds. They are easy to grow, producing a bounty of sweet scented flowers from June up to the first frost.

Roses – Significance and Meaning of Each Color

rose, picture, images, jpg, pictures

Roses come in a wide range of colors. Each different color has a different meaning, or significance. It sends a silent, yet extremely important message from the sender to receiver.

Who originally defined the rose color meanings? We don’t know. But, make sure you are sending the right message when you select roses for someone. Otherwise, he or she will get the wrong message!

Guys, rest assured ….. SHE knows the meaning of every rose color. But, she is only looking for one… the red rose.

Rose Color Meaning
Red Nothing sends the message of love more clearly, than a red rose. Make that a dozen! The meaning of this rose color is quite clear. Red roses represent  love, beauty,  passion, courage and respect.
White Whit is the color of purity and innocence. It also represents silence or secrecy, reverence and humility.
Pink Appreciation,”Thank you”, grace, perfect happiness, and admiration
Dark Pink Send roses of this color to show appreciation or gratitude.
Light Pink admiration, sympathy
Yellow Joy, gladness, friendship, delight, freedom, the promise of a new beginning.
Orange Admiration, desire, enthusiasm, fascination
Red and White Given together, these signify unity.
Red Rosebud A symbol of purity and loveliness
White Rosebud Symbolic of girlhood
Cream Charm, thoughtfulness, graciousness
Thornless Rose Signifies “Love at first sight”.


How to display our Flag.

NEED I SAY MORE?

Happy Mom’s Day

Mother’s Day is a holiday honoring motherhood that is observed in different forms throughout the world. The American incarnation of Mother’s Day was created by Anna Jarvis in 1908 and became an official U.S. holiday in 1914. Jarvis would later denounce the holiday’s commercialization and spent the latter part of her life trying to remove it from the calendar. While dates and celebrations vary, Mother’s Day most commonly falls on the second Sunday in May and traditionally involves presenting mothers with flowers, cards and other gifts.

Celebrations of mothers and motherhood can be traced back to the ancient Greeks and Romans, who held festivals in honor of the mother goddesses Rhea and Cybele, but the clearest modern precedent for Mother’s Day is the early Christian festival known as “Mothering Sunday.”

Once a major tradition in the United Kingdom and parts of Europe, this celebration fell on the fourth Sunday in Lent and was originally seen as a time when the faithful would return to their “mother church”—the main church in the vicinity of their home—for a special service.

Over time the Mothering Sunday tradition shifted into a more secular holiday, and children would present their mothers with flowers and other tokens of appreciation. This custom eventually faded in popularity before merging with the American Mother’s Day in the 1930s and 1940s.

DID YOU KNOW?

More phone calls are made on Mother’s Day than any other day of the year. These holiday chats with Mom often cause phone traffic to spike by as much as 37 percent.

ANN REEVES JARVIS AND JULIA WARD HOWE

The origins of Mother’s Day as celebrated in the United States date back to the 19th century. In the years before the Civil War, Ann Reeves Jarvis of West Virginia helped start “Mothers’ Day Work Clubs” to teach local women how to properly care for their children.

These clubs later became a unifying force in a region of the country still divided over the Civil War. In 1868 Jarvis organized “Mothers’ Friendship Day,” at which mothers gathered with former Union and Confederate soldiers to promote reconciliation.

Another precursor to Mother’s Day came from the abolitionist and suffragette Julia Ward Howe. In 1870 Howe wrote the “Mother’s Day Proclamation,” a call to action that asked mothers to unite in promoting world peace. In 1873 Howe campaigned for a “Mother’s Peace Day” to be celebrated every June 2.

Other early Mother’s Day pioneers include Juliet Calhoun Blakely, a temperance activist who inspired a local Mother’s Day in Albion, Michigan, in the 1870s. The duo of Mary Towles Sasseen and Frank Hering, meanwhile, both worked to organize a Mothers’ Day in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Some have even called Hering “the father of Mothers’ Day.

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WORLD STROKE MONTH


May is World Stroke Month. Many health and heart organizations come together every May to raise awareness about the causes and effects of stroke.

One of their biggest campaigns is FAST, teaching the world to know the symptoms of stroke and how to respond quickly to help save a life.

Face – By asking the person to smile you can tell immediately if one side of the face droops.

Arm – Ask the person to raise both arms. Observe to see if one arm drifts lower than the other.

Speech – Slurred speech is a symptom of stroke. Ask the person to repeat a single sentence.

Time – Call 911-Fast. Time may be the difference between life and death or even partial and full recovery.

HOW TO OBSERVE

Visit http://www.worldstrokecampaign.org or http://www.strokeassociation.org for more information on stroke. Use #WorldStrokeMonth to post on social media.

HISTORY

Within our research, National Day Calendar was unable to identify historical information regarding the first World Stroke Month. The Centers for Disease Control, the American Heart Association, World Stroke Campaign and many other have all participated in bringing education, research, and treatment on a global basis.

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