Day 2 Street -Developing your Eye

 

Day 2 Street Page Visit the resource page

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Day Two: “Street” — Establishing Shot

Yesterday, we asked you to interpret home in your own way. Today, let’s focus on a street. It can be a quiet road blanketed in snow, an alley covered with murals, or a busy avenue where pedestrians weave between cars and motorbikes.

Wander your neighborhood — or someplace new — to capture your street snapshot.

Today’s Tip: While you’re free to take a picture from any angle, try to capture an establishing shot: a wide-angle photo that sets up a scene. You may need to back up a few steps, or climb some stairs to higher ground to fit the whole scene in one shot.

Visit the resource page for details on taking a wide shot. Remember to tag your post with #developingyoureye and check the Reader to see posts from fellow course participants

My Pic of the Week

I love to travel the world and with my husband. We just took a transatlantic cruise in April. This is the Flemish Country side.

 

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Day 1 Home-Developing Your Eye

When I think of home I see the Mackinaw Bridge because I live in the upper lower of Michigan. The bridge is 5 miles long and it connects to upper Michigan. Also lakes are a big part of Michigan, I live across the street from Lake Huron.

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The forgotten legend behind the world’s most famous tongue twister.

FeaturedInstant ArticlesNewsAug 26, 2016 Ian Harvey


For most of us, tongue twisters are simply an amusing childish wordplay. Nevertheless, little did we know there was quite some significant history behind one of the world’s most famous tongue twisters of all.

“She sells seashells by the seashore” this tongue twister take us back to the 19th century when the woman referred to simply as “she” was a real person, and carried the name of Mary Anning.

Anning was born on 21 May 1799, in Dorset, southwest of England. Her family had a rather unusual way of earning money for living. It involved digging up fossils and selling them to people who visited the coast. Although this might sound strange, but back in the 19th century, rich and middle-class people loved having curio cabinets as showpieces in their living rooms. These cabinets were often decorated with various natural relics including fossils, most of them souvenirs brought from abroad.


Portrait of Mary Anning with her dog Tray – Natural History Museum, London

Drawing of Mary Anning’s house in Lyme Regis, Dorset, England.

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My Pic of the Week

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Weekly Photo Challenge- Surprise

Surprise

Weekly Photo Challenge- Reflecting

ReflectingWhether it’s water or some other reflective surface, what have you seen recently that has changed your perspective on the view?

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