To You and Yours

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Never Forget

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Wordless Wednesday

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Day Ten: “Architecture” — Go Monochrome Developing Your Eye

Day Ten: “Architecture” — Go Monochrome

When we talk about monochrome in photography, we’re referring to images developed or executed in black and white or in varying tones of only one color.

Today, think about how black, white, gray, and the shades in between can interact in your frame in dynamic ways. As you compose your architecture shot, look for sharp lines, distinct patterns, defined shapes, large surface areas, and very light and very dark colors.

If you’ve never shot in black in white, many devices and phone cameras let you switch to black and white shooting mode right in the camera. In the iPhone, for example, select the Mono, Tonal, or Noir settings to shoot in monochrome.

Learn more about black and white photography and get inspired by moody, dramatic images in Merilee’s great tutorial on shooting in black and white.

Day Nine: “A Pop of Color” Developing Your Eye

pop1pop2pop3pop4Day Nine: “A Pop of Color” — Incorporate Color

The colors in our photographs are evocative and rouse emotions within us. Color can elevate a mundane image into something beautiful and intriguing, and can tell a tale within the frame.

Today, pay attention to how color affects your image. Let color be the star!

Today’s Tip: Keep it simple: experiment with only one color.

Visit the resource page for tips on incorporating color. Remember to tag your post with #developingyoureye and check the Reader to see posts from fellow course participants!

Day Eight: “Treasure” — Zoom In Developing Your Eye

 Only God can make such a beautiful thing so that is a real treasure!

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The earth laughs in flowers.

Ralph Waldo Emerson

Day Eight: “Treasure” — Zoom In

Objects, places, people, moments — we all cherish something or someone. Anything deeply meaningful to you can be a treasure.

A treasure can be grand, like a precious heirloom, or teeny-tiny, like the first plump blackberry of spring atop a tart.

Or perhaps it’s the vintage coat passed down from your grandmother, your once-in-a-lifetime trip through the Himalayas, a quiet space in the woods, or your children. What’s your treasure?

Today’s Tip: Get close to your subject. Use the zoom function in your camera, or physically move closer to it. Often, our goal is to capture as much of a scene as we can. This time, zoom in on your subject or a particular detail to tell a more interesting story.

Visit the resource page for details. Remember to tag your post with #developingyoureye and check the Reader to see posts from fellow course participants!

Day Six: “Solitude” Developing your eye

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Day Six: “Solitude” — The Rule of Thirds

Today, let’s capture solitude: the state of being alone, or a lonely and uninhabited place. What does this word look like to you?

Today’s Tip: Pay attention to the placement of your subject. As you frame your shot, consider the Rule of Thirds, which is a great introductory lesson in composition. Divide your shot into thirds, both horizontally and vertically, so you get nine parts:

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Place your subject at the intersections of these lines (or along them) to create a dynamic, off-center composition.

Visit the resource page for details on the Rule of Thirds. Remember to tag your post with #developingyoureye and check the Reader to see posts from fellow course participants!

My Pic of the Week

I love to travel the world and with my husband. We just took a transatlantic cruise in April. This is the Flemish Country side.

 

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Day 1 Home-Developing Your Eye

When I think of home I see the Mackinaw Bridge because I live in the upper lower of Michigan. The bridge is 5 miles long and it connects to upper Michigan. Also lakes are a big part of Michigan, I live across the street from Lake Huron.

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The forgotten legend behind the world’s most famous tongue twister.

FeaturedInstant ArticlesNewsAug 26, 2016 Ian Harvey


For most of us, tongue twisters are simply an amusing childish wordplay. Nevertheless, little did we know there was quite some significant history behind one of the world’s most famous tongue twisters of all.

“She sells seashells by the seashore” this tongue twister take us back to the 19th century when the woman referred to simply as “she” was a real person, and carried the name of Mary Anning.

Anning was born on 21 May 1799, in Dorset, southwest of England. Her family had a rather unusual way of earning money for living. It involved digging up fossils and selling them to people who visited the coast. Although this might sound strange, but back in the 19th century, rich and middle-class people loved having curio cabinets as showpieces in their living rooms. These cabinets were often decorated with various natural relics including fossils, most of them souvenirs brought from abroad.


Portrait of Mary Anning with her dog Tray – Natural History Museum, London

Drawing of Mary Anning’s house in Lyme Regis, Dorset, England.

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