National Crayon Collection Month

Preparing for the return to school, National Crayon Collection Month in August makes a point of ensuring every child has this essential school supply.

Those gently used, but discarded restaurant crayons are the focus of Crayon Collection, a 501c3 non-profit organization dedicated to redirecting mountains of much-needed crayons from landfills to schools. National Crayon Collection Month draws awareness to the environmental and social impact of throwing crayons away while students across the country go without crucial classroom supplies.

Throughout the month, families and teachers are encouraged to ask managers of kid-friendly restaurants to save their discarded crayons.  At the end of the campaign, they can return to the restaurant, collect the restaurant’s saved crayons and donate them to their local schools. Bringing all those simple but brightly colored art tools to classrooms will free up teacher resources and place them into the hands of children who might have gone without.

Our goal is for every child in America to have the crayons they need in time for the start of school. With the help of kid-friendly restaurants we can reallocate resources so that instead of trashing this like-new art supply, we can collect them for children to learn and expand their imaginations with. ~Sheila Michail Morovati – Founder Crayon Collection

Crayons don’t decompose, but in the hands of young, supple minds, they foster visual learning, creativity, and academic achievement. Annually, over 150 million restaurant crayons given to young diners eventually end up in landfills. End to end, those crayons could span the contiguous United States 3 times or scale the Empire State Building 30,175 times. Wouldn’t those barely used crayons better serve the nearly 16 million children who live in poverty and are unable to afford even this simple tool of expression?  By collecting and redistributing crayons, our teachers can put some of the almost $900 of their own money they spend preparing their classrooms each fall, back into their pockets. Districts across the country continue to cut art funding despite the research supporting the positive impacts it has on scholastic performance. Putting art back in the classroom and giving students an environment for creativity cultivates curiosity and promotes learning.

HOW TO OBSERVE

Ask the question of your local restaurants. “Will you save crayons?” Be sure to make a commitment, too.  Collect the crayons from the restaurant at the end of the month and donate them to your schools. Teachers can participate in the Crayon Collection Curriculum to bring more art into your classroom. Share photos of your collections and art by using #GotCrayons on social media to encourage others to participate and to show how simply you can gain access to thousands of crayons. Want to learn more? Visit Crayon Collection and find out more about how to participate in National Crayon Collection Month.
Follow Crayon Collection on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter, too!

Kid Friendly Restaurants
IHOP                                          Denny’s
Applebees                                  BJ’s
Cracker Barrel                           Olive Garden
California Pizza Kitchen          Outback
Island’s Restaurants                Buffalo Wild Wings
Bubba Gump

National Girlfriends Day. My BFF Day


National Girlfriends Day is recognized annually on August 1, as girlfriends get together around the United States and celebrate their special bond of Girlfriends can often be our sisters or mothers, classmates or co-workers. These dearest friends who are here for us.

Girlfriends can often be our sisters or mothers, classmates or co-workers. These dearest friends who are here for us.  They enjoy spending time together, laughing and sharing secrets.  They seek us out in times of need, and we seek each other out in times of celebration. When it’s time for a glass of wine or a long walk, girlfriends are there. They enjoy spending time together, laughing and sharing secrets.  


Friendship is one of the most special connections in life. 

Whether we have one or many, girlfriends make life better, fuller and complete.  National Girlfriends Day celebrates the unlimited ways life is better with our girlfriends in it. 

HOW TO OBSERVE
Today, let your gal pals know just how much they mean to you and how special they are in your life. Go out for lunch or a drink with a friend. Post on social media using #NationalGirlfriendsDay.

HISTORY
National Girlfriends Day was created by the social networking site, www.sisterwoman.com.

Yummmmmmmmmm

Memories 

National Mac and Cheese Day

One of the classic comfort foods earns a place of honor on July 14. It is National Mac and Cheese Day!

Made with macaroni noodles, cream or milk, and the golden goodness of cheese, mac and cheese shines as a side dish but can stand on its own as a main dish as well. From the classic mac and cheese with cheddar or American cheeses to the spicy cowboy mac with bacon and jalapenos, there’s a combination for everyone. Mix up the cheeses or load up on seasonings, set the broiler for a couple of minutes at the end of the cooking time and let the cheese get a nice toasty crust.

HOW TO OBSERVE

Enjoy some mac and cheese! Use #NationalMacAndCheeseDay to share on social media.

HISTORY

Within our research, we were unable to identify the creator of National Mac and Cheese Day.

There are over 1,500 national days. Don’t miss a single one. Celebrate Every Day with National Day Calendar!

National French Fry Day July 13


Each year on July 13, many people will participate in National French Fry Day by enjoying one of the many varieties of the classic food.
French fries, also known as chips, fries, finger chips or French-fried potatoes, are batons of deep-fried potatoes and are common fixtures at fast food restaurants that are loved by adults and kids alike!

A wide selection of condiments such as ketchup, ranch dressing, vinegar, mayonnaise, honey mustard, cheese and many more compliment French fries. Sweet potatoes make an alternate, healthier offering of fries found on menus around the country. Other varieties are baked and come in unusual shapes such as curls, waffles, crinkle or tornado cut. 

The expression “French Fried Potatoes” first occurs in print in English in the 1856 work Cookery for Maids of All Work by E. Warren.

It is believed by some that the term “French” was introduced to the potatoes when the American soldiers arrived in Belgium during World War I and consequently tasted Belgian fries. It is suggested that they called them “French” as it was the official language of the Belgian Army at that time.

HOW TO OBSERVE

To celebrate National French Fry Day, share some French fries with your friends and have them seasoned, cut and shaped how you like them! Post on social media using #NationalFrenchFryDay .

HISTORY

Within our research, we were unable to find the creator or origin of National French Fry Day.

Happy 4th of July!!

Image

The Story of the Fourth of July


The Declaration of Independence

We celebrate American Independence Day on the Fourth of July every year. We think of July 4, 1776, as a day that represents the Declaration of Independence and the birth of the United States of America as an independent nation.

But July 4, 1776 wasn’t the day that the Continental Congress decided to declare independence (they did that on July 2, 1776).

It wasn’t the day we started the American Revolution either (that had happened back in April 1775).

And it wasn’t the day Thomas Jefferson wrote the first draft of the Declaration of Independence (that was in June 1776). Or the date on which the Declaration was delivered to Great Britain (that didn’t happen until November 1776). Or the date it was signed (that was August 2, 1776).

 

So what did happen on July 4, 1776?

The Continental Congress approved the final wording of the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776. They’d been working on it for a couple of days after the draft was submitted on July 2nd and finally agreed on all of the edits and changes.

July 4, 1776, became the date that was included on the Declaration of Independence, and the fancy handwritten copy that was signed in August (the copy now displayed at the National Archives in Washington, D.C.) It’s also the date that was printed on the Dunlap Broadsides, the original printed copies of the Declaration that were circulated throughout the new nation. So when people thought of the Declaration of Independence, July 4, 1776 was the date they remembered.

In contrast, we celebrate Constitution Day on September 17th of each year, the anniversary of the date the Constitution was signed, not the anniversary of the date it was approved. If we’d followed this same approach for the Declaration of Independence we’d being celebrating Independence Day on August 2nd of each year, the day the Declaration of Independence was signed!

 

How did the Fourth of July become a national holiday?

For the first 15 or 20 years after the Declaration was written, people didn’t celebrate it much on any date. It was too new and too much else was happening in the young nation. By the 1790s, a time of bitter partisan conflicts, the Declaration had become controversial. One party, the Democratic-Republicans, admired Jefferson and the Declaration. But the other party, the Federalists, thought the Declaration was too French and too anti-British, which went against their current policies.

By 1817, John Adams complained in a letter that America seemed uninterested in its past. But that would soon change.

After the War of 1812, the Federalist party began to come apart and the new parties of the 1820s and 1830s all considered themselves inheritors of Jefferson and the Democratic-Republicans. Printed copies of the Declaration began to circulate again, all with the date July 4, 1776, listed at the top. The deaths of Thomas Jefferson and John Adams on July 4, 1826, may even have helped to promote the idea of July 4 as an important date to be celebrated.

Celebrations of the Fourth of July became more common as the years went on and in 1870, almost a hundred years after the Declaration was written, Congress first declared July 4 to be a national holiday as part of a bill to officially recognize several holidays, including Christmas. Further legislation about national holidays, including July 4, was passed in 1939 and 1941.

July Is National Juvenile Arthritis Awareness Month

children

Each year at this time, we commemorate the estimated 300,000 children and their families in the United States who face the everyday challenges of living with juvenile arthritis (JA) and related diseases. Juvenile arthritis is an umbrella term used to describe the many autoimmune and inflammatory conditions or pediatric rheumatic diseases that can develop in children and teens.

The various types of juvenile arthritis share many common symptoms, like pain, joint swelling, redness and warmth, but each type of JA is distinct and has its own unique characteristics and how it affects the body.

Common Types of Juvenile Arthritis

Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)

Considered the most common form of childhood arthritis, JIA includes six subtypes: oligoarthritis, polyarthritis, systemic, enthesitis-related, juvenile psoriatic arthritis or undifferentiated.

Juvenile dermatomyositis

An inflammatory disease, juvenile dermatomyositis causes muscle weakness and a skin rash on the eyelids and knuckles.

Juvenile lupus

Lupus is an autoimmune disease. The most common form is systemic lupus erythematosus, or SLE. Lupus can affect the joints, skin, kidneys, blood and other parts of the body.

Juvenile scleroderma

Scleroderma, which literally means “hard skin,” describes a group of conditions that can cause the skin to tighten and harden.

Kawasaki disease

This disease causes blood vessel inflammation that can lead to heart complications.

Mixed connective tissue disease

This disease may include features of arthritis, lupus dermatomyositis and scleroderma, and is associated with very high levels of a particular antinuclear antibody called anti-RNP.

Fibromyalgia

This chronic pain syndrome is an arthritis-related condition, which can cause stiffness and aching, along with fatigue, disrupted sleep and other symptoms. More common in girls, fibromyalgia is seldom diagnosed before puberty.

July Fun Facts

The 7th month of the year brings us Independence Day and Canada Day.

In the Georgian calendar, the calendar that most of the world uses, July is the seventh month. However, on the Roman calendar, it was actually the fifth month and was call Quintilis, which meant fifth. Later in 46 B.C., Caesar gave 31 days and the Roman Senates named the month Julius in honor of Caesar. In northern hemisphere, July is usually the hottest month of the year when it is actually a winter time in southern hemisphere. It gets very cold in Antarctica and cold and rainy in South America. Because there isn’t much rain in July, the grass loses its greenness. Moreover, the abundance of flowers and insects occur in July.

Below are some fun facts about July:

  1. The birthstone for July is the Ruby.
  2. The zodiac signs for July are Cancer (June 21 – July 22) and Leo (July 23 – August 22)
  3. The birth flower for July is the water lily.
  4. The month of July was named after Julius Caesar.
  5. On July 1, 1867, the Dominion of Canada was established due to the British North America Act.
  6. On July 1, 1898, the San Juan Hill was occupied by the American troops during the Spanish-American War.
  7. During World War I on July 1, 1916, the Battle of Somme began.
  8. On July 2, 1881, President James Garfield was killed by Charles Guiteau.
  9. On July 2, 1890, the Sherman Antitrust Act (an Act to prohibit trusts) was passed by the United States Congress.
  10. On July 5, 1971, Amendment 26 was proclaimed which set the voting age at 18 in the United States.
  11. On July 6, 1854, the Republican Party held its first state convention at Jackson, Michigan.
  12. On July 11, 1804, during a duel between Aaron Burr and Alexander Hamilton, Hamilton was killed.
  13. The 38th President of the United States, Gerald R. Ford, was born on July 1, 1913.
  14. On July 16, 1790, District of Columbia was established.
  15. The first atomic bomb was set off by scientists in Alamogordo, New Mexico on July 16, 1945.
  16. National Blueberry Month
  17. National Ice Cream Month
  18. National Hot Dog Month
  19. July 1 – Canada Day
  20. July 4 – Independence Day

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