The forgotten legend behind the world’s most famous tongue twister.

FeaturedInstant ArticlesNewsAug 26, 2016 Ian Harvey


For most of us, tongue twisters are simply an amusing childish wordplay. Nevertheless, little did we know there was quite some significant history behind one of the world’s most famous tongue twisters of all.

“She sells seashells by the seashore” this tongue twister take us back to the 19th century when the woman referred to simply as “she” was a real person, and carried the name of Mary Anning.

Anning was born on 21 May 1799, in Dorset, southwest of England. Her family had a rather unusual way of earning money for living. It involved digging up fossils and selling them to people who visited the coast. Although this might sound strange, but back in the 19th century, rich and middle-class people loved having curio cabinets as showpieces in their living rooms. These cabinets were often decorated with various natural relics including fossils, most of them souvenirs brought from abroad.


Portrait of Mary Anning with her dog Tray – Natural History Museum, London

Drawing of Mary Anning’s house in Lyme Regis, Dorset, England.

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Happy Mom’s Day

Mother’s Day is a holiday honoring motherhood that is observed in different forms throughout the world. The American incarnation of Mother’s Day was created by Anna Jarvis in 1908 and became an official U.S. holiday in 1914. Jarvis would later denounce the holiday’s commercialization and spent the latter part of her life trying to remove it from the calendar. While dates and celebrations vary, Mother’s Day most commonly falls on the second Sunday in May and traditionally involves presenting mothers with flowers, cards and other gifts.

Celebrations of mothers and motherhood can be traced back to the ancient Greeks and Romans, who held festivals in honor of the mother goddesses Rhea and Cybele, but the clearest modern precedent for Mother’s Day is the early Christian festival known as “Mothering Sunday.”

Once a major tradition in the United Kingdom and parts of Europe, this celebration fell on the fourth Sunday in Lent and was originally seen as a time when the faithful would return to their “mother church”—the main church in the vicinity of their home—for a special service.

Over time the Mothering Sunday tradition shifted into a more secular holiday, and children would present their mothers with flowers and other tokens of appreciation. This custom eventually faded in popularity before merging with the American Mother’s Day in the 1930s and 1940s.

DID YOU KNOW?

More phone calls are made on Mother’s Day than any other day of the year. These holiday chats with Mom often cause phone traffic to spike by as much as 37 percent.

ANN REEVES JARVIS AND JULIA WARD HOWE

The origins of Mother’s Day as celebrated in the United States date back to the 19th century. In the years before the Civil War, Ann Reeves Jarvis of West Virginia helped start “Mothers’ Day Work Clubs” to teach local women how to properly care for their children.

These clubs later became a unifying force in a region of the country still divided over the Civil War. In 1868 Jarvis organized “Mothers’ Friendship Day,” at which mothers gathered with former Union and Confederate soldiers to promote reconciliation.

Another precursor to Mother’s Day came from the abolitionist and suffragette Julia Ward Howe. In 1870 Howe wrote the “Mother’s Day Proclamation,” a call to action that asked mothers to unite in promoting world peace. In 1873 Howe campaigned for a “Mother’s Peace Day” to be celebrated every June 2.

Other early Mother’s Day pioneers include Juliet Calhoun Blakely, a temperance activist who inspired a local Mother’s Day in Albion, Michigan, in the 1870s. The duo of Mary Towles Sasseen and Frank Hering, meanwhile, both worked to organize a Mothers’ Day in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Some have even called Hering “the father of Mothers’ Day.

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WORLD STROKE MONTH


May is World Stroke Month. Many health and heart organizations come together every May to raise awareness about the causes and effects of stroke.

One of their biggest campaigns is FAST, teaching the world to know the symptoms of stroke and how to respond quickly to help save a life.

Face – By asking the person to smile you can tell immediately if one side of the face droops.

Arm – Ask the person to raise both arms. Observe to see if one arm drifts lower than the other.

Speech – Slurred speech is a symptom of stroke. Ask the person to repeat a single sentence.

Time – Call 911-Fast. Time may be the difference between life and death or even partial and full recovery.

HOW TO OBSERVE

Visit http://www.worldstrokecampaign.org or http://www.strokeassociation.org for more information on stroke. Use #WorldStrokeMonth to post on social media.

HISTORY

Within our research, National Day Calendar was unable to identify historical information regarding the first World Stroke Month. The Centers for Disease Control, the American Heart Association, World Stroke Campaign and many other have all participated in bringing education, research, and treatment on a global basis.

What is Presidents’ Day

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Heart Disease in Men

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Heart disease is the leading cause of death for men in the United States, killing 307,225 men in 2009—that’s 1 in every 4 male deaths.  Heart disease is the leading cause of death for men of most racial/ethnic groups in the United States, including African Americans, American Indians or Alaska Natives, Hispanics, and whites. For Asian American or Pacific Islander men, heart disease is second only to cancer.  About 8.5% of all white men, 7.9% of black men, and 6.3% of Mexican American men have coronary heart disease. Half of the men who die suddenly of coronary heart disease have no previous symptoms. Even if you have no symptoms, you may still be at risk for heart disease. Between 70% and 89% of sudden cardiac events occur in men.

Risk Factors

High blood pressure, high LDL cholesterol, and smoking are key risk factors for heart disease. About half of Americans (49%) have at least one of these three risk factors.

Several other medical conditions and lifestyle choices can also put people at a higher risk for heart disease, including:

ď‚· Diabetes

ď‚· Overweight and obesity

ď‚· Poor diet

ď‚· Physical inactivity

 Excessive alcohol use CDC’s Public Health Efforts

CDC’s Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention Program

Since 1998, CDC has funded state health departments’ efforts to reduce the number of people with heart disease or stroke. Health departments in 41 states and the District of Columbia currently receive funding. The program stresses policy and education to promote heart-healthy and stroke-free living and working conditions.

Million Hearts™ is a national, public-private initiative of the Department of Health and Human Services to prevent 1 million heart attacks and strokes by 2017. Co-led by CDC and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, the initiative brings together communities, health care professionals, health systems, nonprofit organizations, federal agencies, and private-sector partners to improve care and empower Americans to make heart-healthy choices. For More Information

For more information on heart disease and among men, visit the following Web sites.

ď‚· Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

ď‚· American Heart Association

ď‚· National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute References

For the facts.

Differences in Heart Attacks

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Heart Attack vs Cardiac Arrest

 

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cardiac

 

The 12 days of Christmas have come to an end.

I hope next time you hear this song you may think of it a little differently than just a children’s Christmas song.

Slide1

The Twelve Days of Christmas

On the first day of Christmas,
My true love sent to me
A partridge in a pear tree.

On the second day of Christmas,
My true love sent to me
Two turtle doves, and
A partridge in a pear tree.

On the third day of Christmas,
My true love sent to me More

On the 12th day of Christmas

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Twelve Drummers Drumming – The twelve points of Doctrine in the Apostles’ Creed

1) I believe in God, the Father almighty, creator of heaven and earth.

2) I believe in Jesus Christ, his only Son, our Lord.

3) He was conceived by the power of the Holy Spirit and born of the virgin Mary.

4) He suffered under Pontius Pilate, was crucified, died, and was buried. He descended into hell [the grave].

5) On the third day he rose again. He ascended into heaven, and is seated at the right hand of the Father.

6) He will come again to judge the living and the dead.

7) I believe in the Holy Spirit

8) The holy Catholic Church

9) The communion of saints

10) The forgiveness of sins

11) The resurrection of the body

12) and life everlasting.

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On the 11th day of Christmas

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Eleven Pipers Piping – The Eleven Faithful Apostles

1) Simon Peter

2) Andrew

3) James

4) John

5) Philip

6) Bartholomew

7) Matthew

8) Thomas

9) James bar Alphaeus

10) Simon the Zealot

11) Judas bar James

Luke (6:14-16)

The list does not include the twelfth disciple, Judas Iscariot who betrayed Jesus to the religious leaders and the Romans.  More

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