Happy 4th of July!!

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The Story of the Fourth of July


The Declaration of Independence

We celebrate American Independence Day on the Fourth of July every year. We think of July 4, 1776, as a day that represents the Declaration of Independence and the birth of the United States of America as an independent nation.

But July 4, 1776 wasn’t the day that the Continental Congress decided to declare independence (they did that on July 2, 1776).

It wasn’t the day we started the American Revolution either (that had happened back in April 1775).

And it wasn’t the day Thomas Jefferson wrote the first draft of the Declaration of Independence (that was in June 1776). Or the date on which the Declaration was delivered to Great Britain (that didn’t happen until November 1776). Or the date it was signed (that was August 2, 1776).

 

So what did happen on July 4, 1776?

The Continental Congress approved the final wording of the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776. They’d been working on it for a couple of days after the draft was submitted on July 2nd and finally agreed on all of the edits and changes.

July 4, 1776, became the date that was included on the Declaration of Independence, and the fancy handwritten copy that was signed in August (the copy now displayed at the National Archives in Washington, D.C.) It’s also the date that was printed on the Dunlap Broadsides, the original printed copies of the Declaration that were circulated throughout the new nation. So when people thought of the Declaration of Independence, July 4, 1776 was the date they remembered.

In contrast, we celebrate Constitution Day on September 17th of each year, the anniversary of the date the Constitution was signed, not the anniversary of the date it was approved. If we’d followed this same approach for the Declaration of Independence we’d being celebrating Independence Day on August 2nd of each year, the day the Declaration of Independence was signed!

 

How did the Fourth of July become a national holiday?

For the first 15 or 20 years after the Declaration was written, people didn’t celebrate it much on any date. It was too new and too much else was happening in the young nation. By the 1790s, a time of bitter partisan conflicts, the Declaration had become controversial. One party, the Democratic-Republicans, admired Jefferson and the Declaration. But the other party, the Federalists, thought the Declaration was too French and too anti-British, which went against their current policies.

By 1817, John Adams complained in a letter that America seemed uninterested in its past. But that would soon change.

After the War of 1812, the Federalist party began to come apart and the new parties of the 1820s and 1830s all considered themselves inheritors of Jefferson and the Democratic-Republicans. Printed copies of the Declaration began to circulate again, all with the date July 4, 1776, listed at the top. The deaths of Thomas Jefferson and John Adams on July 4, 1826, may even have helped to promote the idea of July 4 as an important date to be celebrated.

Celebrations of the Fourth of July became more common as the years went on and in 1870, almost a hundred years after the Declaration was written, Congress first declared July 4 to be a national holiday as part of a bill to officially recognize several holidays, including Christmas. Further legislation about national holidays, including July 4, was passed in 1939 and 1941.

July Fun Facts

The 7th month of the year brings us Independence Day and Canada Day.

In the Georgian calendar, the calendar that most of the world uses, July is the seventh month. However, on the Roman calendar, it was actually the fifth month and was call Quintilis, which meant fifth. Later in 46 B.C., Caesar gave 31 days and the Roman Senates named the month Julius in honor of Caesar. In northern hemisphere, July is usually the hottest month of the year when it is actually a winter time in southern hemisphere. It gets very cold in Antarctica and cold and rainy in South America. Because there isn’t much rain in July, the grass loses its greenness. Moreover, the abundance of flowers and insects occur in July.

Below are some fun facts about July:

  1. The birthstone for July is the Ruby.
  2. The zodiac signs for July are Cancer (June 21 – July 22) and Leo (July 23 – August 22)
  3. The birth flower for July is the water lily.
  4. The month of July was named after Julius Caesar.
  5. On July 1, 1867, the Dominion of Canada was established due to the British North America Act.
  6. On July 1, 1898, the San Juan Hill was occupied by the American troops during the Spanish-American War.
  7. During World War I on July 1, 1916, the Battle of Somme began.
  8. On July 2, 1881, President James Garfield was killed by Charles Guiteau.
  9. On July 2, 1890, the Sherman Antitrust Act (an Act to prohibit trusts) was passed by the United States Congress.
  10. On July 5, 1971, Amendment 26 was proclaimed which set the voting age at 18 in the United States.
  11. On July 6, 1854, the Republican Party held its first state convention at Jackson, Michigan.
  12. On July 11, 1804, during a duel between Aaron Burr and Alexander Hamilton, Hamilton was killed.
  13. The 38th President of the United States, Gerald R. Ford, was born on July 1, 1913.
  14. On July 16, 1790, District of Columbia was established.
  15. The first atomic bomb was set off by scientists in Alamogordo, New Mexico on July 16, 1945.
  16. National Blueberry Month
  17. National Ice Cream Month
  18. National Hot Dog Month
  19. July 1 – Canada Day
  20. July 4 – Independence Day

July Fun Facts

month-clipart-0511-1006-2816-4806_Month_of_July_Word_Art_with_Stars_and_Stripes_clipart_image

No only is this month July but it has special meaning it is my birthday month and my wedding anniversary month. July 29th is my birthday and my anniversary.

The 7th month of the year is an outstanding one In the Georgian calendar, the calendar that most of the world uses, July is the seventh month. However, on the Roman calendar, it was actually the fifth month and was call Quintilis, which meant fifth. Later in 46 B.C., Caesar gave 31 days and the Roman Senates named the month Julius in honor of Caesar. In northern hemisphere, July is usually the hottest month of the year when it is actually a winter time in southern hemisphere. It gets very cold in Antarctica and cold and rainy in South America. Because there isn’t much rain in July, the grass loses its greenness. Moreover, the abundance of flowers and insects occur in July. Below are some fun facts about July:

1. The birthstone for July is the Ruby.
  1. 2. The zodiac signs for July are Cancer (June 21 – July 22) and Leo (July 23 – August 22)
3. The birth flower for July is the water lily.
4. The month of July was named after Julius Caesar.
5. On July 1, 1867, the Dominion of Canada was established due to the British North America Act.
6. On July 1, 1898, the San Juan Hill was occupied by the American troops during the Spanish-American War.
7. During World War I on July 1, 1916, the Battle of Somme began.
8. On July 2, 1881, President James Garfield was killed by Charles Guiteau.
9. On July 2, 1890, the Sherman Antitrust Act (an Act to prohibit trusts) was passed by the United States Congress.
10. On July 5, 1971, Amendment 26 was proclaimed which set the voting age at 18 in the United States.
11. On July 6, 1854, the Republican Party held its first state convention at Jackson, Michigan.
12. On July 11, 1804, during a duel between Aaron Burr and Alexander Hamilton, Hamilton was killed.
13. The 38th President of the United States, Gerald R. Ford, was born on July 1, 1913.
14. On July 16, 1790, District of Columbia was established.
15. The first atomic bomb was set off by scientists in Alamogordo, New Mexico on July 16, 1945.
16. National Blueberry Month
17. National Ice Cream Month
18. National Hot Dog Month
19. July 1 – Canada Day
20. July 4 – Independence Day

July is Juvenile Arthritis

 

The form of arthritis that these kids experience is not the same as grandma’s aches and pains. These children suffer from an autoimmune form of arthritis. Their body’s immune system is attacking their joints, causing swelling, stiffness and permanent damage. This condition is extremely serious; if left untreated it can result in death.

Nearly 300,000 children have been diagnosed with some form of juvenile arthritis in the U.S.* Each year, the Arthritis National Research Foundation provides a grant to this particular form of arthritis research, called The Kelly Award for Juvenile Arthritis Research.

Juvenile-Arthritis-Kids

Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), one form of juvenile arthritis, is actually quite prevalent, affecting more than 50,000 children in the United States alone. JIA is often referred to as juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) in the United States. Other specific names and forms of juvenile arthritis include: systemic onset JIA or Still’s disease, oligoarticular JIA (affecting fewer than 5 joints), polyarticular JIA (affecting five or more joints), enthesitis-related arthritis and psoriatic arthritis.

When juvenile arthritis first shows its symptoms in a child’s body, many parents write off swollen joints and fever as a flu bug, or think that a sudden rash might have occurred from an allergic reaction. The symptoms might even recede slightly before showing up again, sometimes delaying diagnosis for quite some time. After all, who expects a small child to have arthritis?

Most people don’t know that kids get arthritis. A child’s immune system is not fully formed until about age 18; so an “autoimmune” form of arthritis is especially aggressive in children, compromising their ability fight normal diseases and leaving them open to complications that may affect their eyes, bone growth, etc.

For more information.

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