National Military Month

Pearl Harbor Day – remember and honor the 2,403 victims who were killed in the Japanese surprise attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941.

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National Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day, which is annually on December 7, commemorates the attack on Pearl Harbor, in Hawaii, during World War II. Many American service men and women lost their lives or were injured on December 7, 1941.

National Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day is also referred to as Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day or Pearl Harbor Day

The attack on Pearl Harbor

On Sunday morning, December 7, 1941, the Imperial Japanese Navy Air Service attacked Naval Station Pearl Harbor in Honululu, Hawaii, without warning and without a declaration of war, killing 2,403 American non-combatants, and injuring 1,178 others. The attack sank two U.S. Navy battleships and damaged five others. It also damaged three cruisers, three destroyers, and one minelayer. Aircraft losses were 188 destroyed and 159 damaged.

Aftermath

Within hours of the attack Canada declared war on Japan,[3] the first Western nation to do so. The following day, the United States declared war on Japan and entered World War II on the side of the Allies. In a speech to Congress, President Franklin Roosevelt called the bombing of Pearl Harbor “a date which will live in infamy.”[2]

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Agent Orange Awareness Month

AUGUST and OCTOBER are Agent Orange Awareness MonthSEPTEMBER 28, 20132

It’s time once again to observe Agent Orange Awareness Month. Here at Legacy of Our Veterans Military Exposures or lovme we began observing Agent Orange Awareness not only in the month of August but also October. I know it’s confusing to some but here is a little history behind Agent Orange Awareness Month.

My understanding is that most states have designated October as the month of choice but in Maine, where I live, it’s August.

Senator Susan Collins (R-ME) introduced and passed a resolution making August Agent Orange Awareness Month>>>S.Res.248 – A resolution designating the month of August 2009 as “Agent Orange Awareness Month”

FROM SENATOR COLLINS: Increase Agent Orange Awareness (reprinted here with permission)

“Increase Agent Orange Awareness” Weekly Column Senator Susan Collins August 21, 2009 More than 8.7 million American men and women bravely served our nation during the Vietnam War. More than 58,000 gave their lives defending freedom, including 339 from Maine.

Some three and a half decades later, an estimated 2.6 million Vietnam veterans bear an awful legacy from that conflict – severe, debilitating, and even fatal health problems that have resulted from their exposure to the herbicide Agent Orange. Adding to the tragedy is the fact that these health problems at times afflict not only just those who served in Vietnam, but also their children.

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I spent 35 years in a military uniform (Air Force and the Air National Guard) and I stand for the American Flag and National Anthem. Without us you would not have this freedom you have.    

Remember 

Today is National Code Talkers Day

Let’s take a moment to honor the U.S. Marine Corps Navajo Code Talkers. The secret code these Marines developed, using their native language, could not be intercepted by the Japanese. This contribution helped lead the Allies to victory in the Pacific

National Purple Heart Day

Today we honor recipients of the #PurpleHeart award, paying tribute to their service and sacrifice. The Purple Heart is the oldest military award still given to U.S. military members. #PurpleHeartDay

A day to remember.


My husband and I got to visit Normandy and we went to Omaha, Juno and Utah Beaches. We also went to the American Cemetery it was very sobering. These men and women gave their all. We need to remember them. 

Today marks the 72nd anniversary of the Normandy landings, which have come to become known as D-Day. The term, D-Day, refers to the specific day on which a military combative attack or operation is set to be initiated. However since June 6, 1944 “D-Day” has been tied to the now infamous Normandy landings that initiated the Western Allies effort to liberate mainland Europe from Hitler’s reign and Nazi occupation during World War II. D-Day was the largest seaborne invasion in military history, and the landings were preceded by extensive bombardment, most notably an airborne assault.

The Allied infantry began landing on the coast of France at 6:30 a.m. and by midnight over 150,000 British, US, and Canadian troops had landed in Normandy. Despite the impressive landing and large Allied force, D-Day was a massacre with about 9,000 Allied soldiers either dead or wounded. The death toll was staggering in comparison to the German forces only losing about 4,000 soldiers. Despite the growing death toll and dangerous mission, the Allied forces gained momentum soon began to expand their occupation over the coming months. Due to D-Day Allied troops began the liberation of Europe, General Dwight D. Eisenhower, who commanded the operation soon sent out a broadcast to the citizens of occupied Europe, stating, “Although the initial assault may not have been in your own country, the hour of your liberation is approaching.”

In addition to Eisenhower’s word of comfort and promise to the people of occupied Europe, the events of D-Day inspired generals, soldiers, and U.S. Presidents and other world leaders for years to come. 

“And what a plan! This vast operation is undoubtedly the most complicated and difficult that has ever occurred.” — Winston Churchill

The meaning of the thirteen folds of our American Flag

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I was honored to be in the Honor Guard for our base. It was the most fulfilling and hardest job. Remembering our fallen be it military, police officers and fire fighters is so very important.
Have you ever wondered why the Flag of the United States of America is folded 13 times when it islowered or when it is folded and handed to thenext of kin at the burial of a veteran?


Here is the meaning of each of those folds and what it means:

The first fold of our Flag is a symbol of life.

The second fold is a symbol of our belief in eternal life.

The third fold is made in honor and remembrance of the veterans departing our ranks who gave a portion of their lives for the defense of our country to attain peace throughout the world.

The fourth fold represents our weaker nature, for as American citizens trusting, it is to Him we turn in times of peace as well as in time of war for His divine guidance.

The fifth fold is a tribute to our country, for in the words of Stephen Decatur, “Our Country, in dealing with other countries may she always be right; but it is still our country, right or wrong.”

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The Real Meaning…

I’m frustrated by people all over the country who view the day as anything BUT a day to remember our WAR DEAD. I hate hearing “Happy Memorial Day.”
It’s not Veterans Day. It’s not military appreciation day. Don’t thank me for my service. Please don’t thank me for my service. It’s take the time to pay homage to the men and women who died while wearing the cloth of this nation you’re so freely enjoying today, day.
We’ve all heard, “Freedom isn’t free.”
Since 1776, it’s actually cost us more than 1.3 million lives.
I hope you enjoy your weekend — but I hope you pause to remember, too.

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